What are the reddish /black connectors called on PC boards?

Thread Starter

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,815
What are the reddish (sometimes bblack) connectors called on PC boards? They have crimp pins inside the connector and plug into single or double tow headers. The ones to hook up fans and such.

Seems everyone carries header connectors but few carry the connector for them. :)
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
7,689
There is a bewildering array of connectors available. Some are metric and others Imperial. It is likely the ones to which you refer are 0.1" spacing. That spacing is used for model servos, so hobby shops often have usable connectors, some already with leads and some with just pins and housing.

DigiKey and Mouser catalogs show a lot more. You might want to look at IDC connectors (insulation displacement connectors), as you won't have to buy a crimping tool. IDC connectors are more limited usually in the range of wire sizes they can accept. It is not an exaggeration to say you may spend and entire day trying to find the right connector. It is one instance in which the paper catalog may be easier to use than the electronic version.

John
 

Thread Starter

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,815
You mean female shunt jumpers?

Radio Shack stocks what they call "DIP programming shunts":
http://www.radioshack.com/product/index.jsp?productId=2103807
Ten for $0.99, which actually is a pretty decent price.

Or, you could go on a site like Digikey and search for "female shunt" for starters. They're available in lots of other spacings besides the standard 0.1"
No the actual connector. Those look like the jumpers. nomurphy was right, they are made by molex but molex makes a ton of connector types.

These are the ones for your front display panel, USB etc. Also the connector for the CD audio cable.

I have a 16pin single row LCD panel. I have the snap off headers. I am building a cheapy PIC prototyping board and it would be nice to have those connectors for the LCD panel.
 

Thread Starter

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,815
For this type of thing I found that eBay has some pretty good deals but you sort of have to know what things are called. :)
 

Thread Starter

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,815
I was talking about these little guys:



I found one source on eBay but his selections are pretty limited.

He calls them "fan connectors".
 

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BMorse

Joined Sep 26, 2009
2,675
If you follow the link I showed on the above post, and scroll down the page, digikey has a huge selection of mating connectors for the "fan connectors"
 

Thread Starter

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,815
If you follow the link I showed on the above post, and scroll down the page, digikey has a huge selection of mating connectors for the "fan connectors"

Those should work but not exactly what I was talking about but thanks for point out a very nice feature of their website. Actually one of the few nice features, of their site. I really hate Digikeys site. It is so much easier to search on Mouser.
 

Thread Starter

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,815
There is a bewildering array of connectors available. Some are metric and others Imperial. It is likely the ones to which you refer are 0.1" spacing. That spacing is used for model servos, so hobby shops often have usable connectors, some already with leads and some with just pins and housing.

DigiKey and Mouser catalogs show a lot more. You might want to look at IDC connectors (insulation displacement connectors), as you won't have to buy a crimping tool. IDC connectors are more limited usually in the range of wire sizes they can accept. It is not an exaggeration to say you may spend and entire day trying to find the right connector. It is one instance in which the paper catalog may be easier to use than the electronic version.

John


You said it.

There are a number of different types of IDC. Did you mean something like this?



If so, how do you place the wire?
 

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creakndale

Joined Mar 13, 2009
68
I believe those are Molex KK 6471 series housings and female terminals.

If you are looking for similar, but better, 0.1" connector then look at the Molex SL series. They use a much better crimp terminal, housing, etc.

creakndale
 

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jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
7,689
@spinnaker

The connectors you show may work, but since you mentioned a 16-pin LCD, I was thinking more of the type of connector used with ribbon cable, like you see inside your computer.

Unfortunately, I couldn't copy the DigiKey search. But, here are two versions of connector that I think might work and are easy to assemble with ribbon wire:

http://www.avx.com/docs/catalogs/8284.pdf

http://media.digikey.com/pdf/Data Sheets/Tyco Electonics AMP PDFs/1-103686-1.pdf

For the AVX (first) scroll about half way down to the 8284 and you will see what I mean.

For the Tyco (DigiKey # 208284016000030-ND), attachment is a little different. You press the wire into the gripping pins, press them into the housing, and snap off the tab that hold all the pins together. There is probably a fancy tool for doing that, but it can be done by hand.

John
 

Thread Starter

spinnaker

Joined Oct 29, 2009
7,815
@spinnaker

The connectors you show may work, but since you mentioned a 16-pin LCD, I was thinking more of the type of connector used with ribbon cable, like you see inside your computer.

Unfortunately, I couldn't copy the DigiKey search. But, here are two versions of connector that I think might work and are easy to assemble with ribbon wire:

http://www.avx.com/docs/catalogs/8284.pdf

http://media.digikey.com/pdf/Data Sheets/Tyco Electonics AMP PDFs/1-103686-1.pdf

For the AVX (first) scroll about half way down to the 8284 and you will see what I mean.

For the Tyco (DigiKey # 208284016000030-ND), attachment is a little different. You press the wire into the gripping pins, press them into the housing, and snap off the tab that hold all the pins together. There is probably a fancy tool for doing that, but it can be done by hand.

John
Yes, these are nice and easy to work with but the advantage of the others is that they are smaller and you have more options.
 
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