violation of second law

kubeek

Joined Sep 20, 2005
5,716
you mean some dose of Violet or something?

seriously:
Tell us why you think it could be violated and then someone can answer why it is not true. (no nature laws can be violated, they can only be misunderstood)

BTW why everyone uses these stupid first law and second law names when nearly no-one remembers which one is which?
 

Dave

Joined Nov 17, 2003
6,970
The Second Law of Thermodynamics - Entorpy increases with time, or in laymans terms the levelling of physical properties such as temperature, density and pressure, in only (as far as I'm concerned) applicable to macro-physical systems (i.e. large).

If you could recreate the green-house effect on a macro-scale then it would be interesting to see how entropy behaves (or more correctly how the green-house effect changes).

I am moving this to the physics forum.

Dave
 

thingmaker3

Joined May 16, 2005
5,084
Courtesy of Dr. Sam B. Knapp, PhD (My wife's dad)...



First Law of Thermogoddammits: You can't get something for nothing

Second Law of Thermogoddammits: You can only break even at absolute zero

Third Law of Thermogoddammits: You can't get to absolute zero



More seriously, the second law of thermodynamics applies to closed systems. Energy from the sun and from cosmic background radiation continues to enter our atmosphere, so it must be considered as part of the system for thermodynamics purposes.
 

Dave

Joined Nov 17, 2003
6,970
Courtesy of Dr. Sam B. Knapp, PhD (My wife's dad)...



First Law of Thermogoddammits: You can't get something for nothing

Second Law of Thermogoddammits: You can only break even at absolute zero

Third Law of Thermogoddammits: You can't get to absolute zero
If I ever write a paper that requires some reference to thermodynamics, these are the versions I will use! :D

More seriously, the second law of thermodynamics applies to closed systems. Energy from the sun and from cosmic background radiation continues to enter our atmosphere, so it must be considered as part of the system for thermodynamics purposes.
You are absolutely correct about closed systems. I think thermodynamic scientists and engineers like to call them Isolated Systems.

Dave
 
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