Uses for this motor stator/casing?

Thread Starter

RogueRose

Joined Oct 10, 2014
375
I came across this piece of a motor. It has 3 or 4 wires coming out of it and weighs 70-90 lbs about 10" diameter and ~14-15" length. I'm wondering if this can be used for anything other than scrap. Also would this be the stator as the rotor would be the magnetic core that goes in the middle?
 

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Hypatia's Protege

Joined Mar 1, 2015
3,208
I'm wondering if this can be used for anything other than scrap.
In the unlikely event the unit is a 3-Φ stator, you may be able to use it as a phase combining/splitting transformer -- though said operation is 'iffy' sans a rotor -- Otherwise, perhaps, a low frequency induction heater --- Frankly, there is little practical application for an 'orphaned stator' - That said, I sympathize with your reluctance to discard an intricate piece of 'handy work':cool:

Also would this be the stator as the rotor would be the magnetic core that goes in the middle?
The pictured unit is definitely a stator! -- Most likely from a single phase induction motor equipped with a starting winding...

Even were you to separate the copper, there isn't much scrap value there -- You may wish to consider consulting a motor/generator service shop -- Should it be part of a frequently serviced unit, you would likely realize significantly more than from a salvage operation...

Best regards and good luck!
HP:)
 

Thread Starter

RogueRose

Joined Oct 10, 2014
375
In the unlikely event the unit is a 3-Φ stator, you may be able to use it as a phase combining/splitting transformer -- though said operation is 'iffy' sans a rotor -- Otherwise, perhaps, a low frequency induction heater --- Frankly, there is little practical application for an 'orphaned stator' - That said, I sympathize with your reluctance to discard an intricate piece of 'handy work':cool:


The pictured unit is definitely a stator! -- Most likely from a single phase induction motor equipped with a starting winding...

Even were you to separate the copper, there isn't much scrap value there -- You may wish to consider consulting a motor/generator service shop -- Should it be part of a frequently serviced unit, you would likely realize significantly more than from a salvage operation...

Best regards and good luck!
HP:)
Thank you for the reply! that is exactly what I was looking for.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
20,081
I'm wondering if this can be used for anything other than scrap. Also would this be the stator as the rotor would be the magnetic core that goes in the middle?
The rotor would not be P.M. material, but a squirrel cage rotor.
Keep the 2 $1 bills and scrap the rest.
Max.
 

tcmtech

Joined Nov 4, 2013
2,868
Going by approximate size and present scrap copper value I would say you have around $40 - $50 worth of metal there!

Granted for HP that's not even worthy of being called mentionable pocket change but for us poor souls who have to work for a living that $40 - $50 is darn near worthy of bitter jealousy between friends. :p
 

ian field

Joined Oct 27, 2012
6,539
In the unlikely event the unit is a 3-Φ stator, you may be able to use it as a phase combining/splitting transformer -- though said operation is 'iffy' sans a rotor -- Otherwise, perhaps, a low frequency induction heater --- Frankly, there is little practical application for an 'orphaned stator' - That said, I sympathize with your reluctance to discard an intricate piece of 'handy work':cool:


The pictured unit is definitely a stator! -- Most likely from a single phase induction motor equipped with a starting winding...

Even were you to separate the copper, there isn't much scrap value there -- You may wish to consider consulting a motor/generator service shop -- Should it be part of a frequently serviced unit, you would likely realize significantly more than from a salvage operation...

Best regards and good luck!
HP:)
Could be left by the back door and used as a boot scraper............................
 
Going by approximate size and present scrap copper value I would say you have around $40 - $50 worth of metal there!
Is copper trading that low?!?:eek::( -- I wonder how much that would improve was the OP to remove the insulation (varnish/enamel)???

Takes less than 15 minutes for one that size if you know what you are doing. ;)
Granted for HP that's not even worthy of being called mentionable pocket change...
Personal perspectives aside -- I'll say this! $200 per hour (i.e. $50 per 15 Min) beats 'stainless steel' (at $1k per 10 Hrs per worker) by a factor of two!:):):)

Again, I urge the OP to talk to a 're-winder' prior to any manner of disposal:)

Very best regards
HP:)
 

tcmtech

Joined Nov 4, 2013
2,868
The last time I considered hauling in scrap copper #2 prepared was at about $2.00 a pound and given a typical induction motor stator core by weight is about 1/3 copper that's what I based my rough estimate on.
 

Thread Starter

RogueRose

Joined Oct 10, 2014
375
Could I turn this into a generator by making a permenant magnet rotor on the inside? I was thinking of something like stacked aluminum "wheels" with minimal clearance between the edge of the rotor/wheel and the inside of the case/stator/windings. I would then drill holes on the outside of the aluminum wheel and sink & secure magnets, in alternating polarities along the outside surface of the wheel.

I'm not positive how the magnets should be arrainged and I think they should alternate + / - in vertical colums. I would think that stronger magnets make for more output but can't be sure.

From what I have seen in other designs of "free energy" windmill designs, this is similar but using a cylindrical stator housing vs the plat stator/magnet setup. I would also think that the magnets need to be charged through their thickness, so if it is a bottom magnet of .5" diameter and 1/4" thickness, then the polarity would be opposed on the surface area.

Does what I describe work in theory or am I missing something here.? What about magent strength. It seems that n48-n52 are pretty darn expensive so I'm curious if there are alternatives that would work with similar output (obviously probably lower, but cost is less as well).
 

GopherT

Joined Nov 23, 2012
8,012
Could I turn this into a generator by making a permenant magnet rotor on the inside? I was thinking of something like stacked aluminum "wheels" with minimal clearance between the edge of the rotor/wheel and the inside of the case/stator/windings. I would then drill holes on the outside of the aluminum wheel and sink & secure magnets, in alternating polarities along the outside surface of the wheel.

I'm not positive how the magnets should be arrainged and I think they should alternate + / - in vertical colums. I would think that stronger magnets make for more output but can't be sure.

From what I have seen in other designs of "free energy" windmill designs, this is similar but using a cylindrical stator housing vs the plat stator/magnet setup. I would also think that the magnets need to be charged through their thickness, so if it is a bottom magnet of .5" diameter and 1/4" thickness, then the polarity would be opposed on the surface area.

Does what I describe work in theory or am I missing something here.? What about magent strength. It seems that n48-n52 are pretty darn expensive so I'm curious if there are alternatives that would work with similar output (obviously probably lower, but cost is less as well).

When the best description of this motor stator is, "it has 3 or 4 wires coming out of it", the best answer I can give you is, "absolutely maybe".
 

Hypatia's Protege

Joined Mar 1, 2015
3,208
Could I turn this into a generator by making a permenant magnet rotor on the inside? I was thinking of something like stacked aluminum "wheels" with minimal clearance between the edge of the rotor/wheel and the inside of the case/stator/windings. I would then drill holes on the outside of the aluminum wheel and sink & secure magnets, in alternating polarities along the outside surface of the wheel.

I'm not positive how the magnets should be arrainged and I think they should alternate + / - in vertical colums. I would think that stronger magnets make for more output but can't be sure.

From what I have seen in other designs of "free energy" windmill designs, this is similar but using a cylindrical stator housing vs the plat stator/magnet setup. I would also think that the magnets need to be charged through their thickness, so if it is a bottom magnet of .5" diameter and 1/4" thickness, then the polarity would be opposed on the surface area.

Does what I describe work in theory or am I missing something here.? What about magent strength. It seems that n48-n52 are pretty darn expensive so I'm curious if there are alternatives that would work with similar output (obviously probably lower, but cost is less as well).
FWIW you are, in essence, describing a bicycle generator on steroids:)



Best regards
HP
 

Hypatia's Protege

Joined Mar 1, 2015
3,208
@tcmtech

Being, as I am, a bit 'weak on magnetics':oops: -- I can but guess the 'cogging effects' referenced in the linked thread are akin to the 'detent' or 'false brinell wear' phenomena observed with many PM devices (e.g. certain stepper motors, etc)??? - If so, why is it objectionable???

With genuine curiosity
HP:)
 

tcmtech

Joined Nov 4, 2013
2,868
It's the same effect as in a stepper motor.

It makes the starting torque breakout force higher.

That and there is the possibility that at some specific cogging frequencies what ever the motor is attached to could develop a wicked mechanical resonance which at worst shakes things to pieces or just makes for a very annoying buzzing sound.

Mostly it's just because of the starting torque issue. ;)
 

Hypatia's Protege

Joined Mar 1, 2015
3,208
It's the same effect as in a stepper motor.

It makes the starting torque breakout force higher.

That and there is the possibility that at some specific cogging frequencies what ever the motor is attached to could develop a wicked mechanical resonance which at worst shakes things to pieces or just makes for a very annoying buzzing sound.

Mostly it's just because of the starting torque issue. ;)
Thanks for that!:)

I find it curious that generators featuring PM rotors aren't in more common use? -- Considering the benefits attendant to obviation of commutators/slip rings it seems any increased cost owed to incorporation of rare-earth magnets or (perhaps) decreased efficiency should be insignificant in comparison with the advantages of essentially maintenance-free operation?:):cool:

Very best regards
HP
 
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