Transformer Question

mozikluv

Joined Jan 22, 2004
1,437
Originally posted by Overclocked2300@Jun 30 2005, 09:18 AM
I have recently bought a transformer. The out puts are 12.1V @9A, 12.9V@2A, 12.9V@3.2A. My question is, can I connect all the outputs in parallel and get 12V out@14 A?

Or would the 12.9 and 12.1V outputs fight each other? How would I know where the positive of the transformer is? (you know the dot shown in circuits)

http://members.fesgaming.com/kaiba/images/transformer.jpg
[post=8839]Quoted post[/post]​

hi

you can't connect the 12.1 to the 12.9. the 12.9s can be, however you must check the 12.9v output if they are really equal. if there is some variance in the output voltage, the output of higher value will carry the most load by trying to compensate for the difference. assuming that you will be drawing at least 80% current capacity the coil with the higher voltage output will hotter than the lower voltage value. this would cause premature failure of the hotter coil.

as to your query where the positive is, there's none. have attach a schem on how it's connected.
 

Thread Starter

Overclocked2300

Joined Apr 24, 2005
124
hmmm crap...so then both will need to go to seperate filters....well I have 6 28,000uf Caps in parallel, and 5 5,500uF Caps in parallel. I could split them up and use 3 28,000uf caps..and 2 5,500uf caps for one side and the same for the other. I would still get good regulation..but its going to a voltage regulator after that anyway. But another problem is that I need the outputs to be adjusted at the same time. I Could always load down the 12.9V to 12.1 and use a dual ganged pot so that they both give the same output.

Wait, if All I need to do is drop .8V or even .7..cant I use a diode in place of R3? I'll take measurements tommrow since it is late.
 

Thread Starter

Overclocked2300

Joined Apr 24, 2005
124
Ya I wanted to know where that is..Or it doesnt matter?

EDIT: Voltages Have been Confirmed.

These were taken under NO LOAD

12.1V reads 12.9V
12.9V Reads 13.6V
 

Thread Starter

Overclocked2300

Joined Apr 24, 2005
124
ok..this is Odd I went and remeasured those voltages...and they vary. Line voltage is 112.5V rms. I get outputs any where from 12.95 to 13.04V on the 12.1V line, and anywhere from 13.55v to 13.88V on the 12.9V line...What gives? All voltages are without rectification or regulation and filtering. Ive tested it with a load (1k) and the voltages dont move for squat! Im guessing I will have to rectifiy the voltages and filter them?

EDIT: I hooked up a rectifer, and some filter Caps. The caps take a long time to charge up. They dont even reach 12V. I thought in linear powersupplys they take almost no time charging up. I decreased the filter caps down to 1 5,500uF Cap. It takes about 5 seconds for it to reach 1V. As anyone experienced these problems?
 

mozikluv

Joined Jan 22, 2004
1,437
hi,

based on your test measurement of the 12.1vac you would have theoritical bridge rectified output of 18.3v (unloaded). as to the 12.9vac it would have 19.6v. again all these outputs are based on your mainline measurement of 112v. if your line goes up to 120v the secondary will of course also go up.

if you are going to regulate the output use a adjustable high current regulators so you can change the output voltage whatever level you want.

it does not take that long for a cap to fully charge. your caps could be defective.

then the claim on the transformer of +/-3% variance is not true.
 

Thread Starter

Overclocked2300

Joined Apr 24, 2005
124
On post #5 those measurements were taken without rectification.

How would I tell if the caps are defective? Or how would I test? Is it because I dont have a load across them?

EDIT: Thanks mozikluv, that cap was dead..or I had the leads wrong..haha. If I could give u rep I would for that! Im going to go though and test the others out. Hopefully I'll have enough caps for some good regulation. As said in my other posts, I need atleast 10,000uF.
 

Thread Starter

Overclocked2300

Joined Apr 24, 2005
124
Well I'll be a sonovagun...The big caps charge slowly...buuut I found that one of the smaller caps charge the same way. So out of curiosity, I let it charge up to 16.67V..and discharged it quickly with a screwdriver. The next Time I charged it It charged perfectly Fine.

I did the same technique with one of the bigger caps. Works the same way except the one I tried it on was charged at 15.75 volts and had to charge up to 16.67V

Maybe they are just old and the substance needs to re align itself or something.
 

mozikluv

Joined Jan 22, 2004
1,437
Originally posted by Overclocked2300@Jul 1 2005, 09:48 PM
On post #5 those measurements were taken without rectification.

How would I tell if the caps are defective? Or how would I test? Is it because I dont have a load across them?

EDIT: Thanks mozikluv, that cap was dead..or I had the leads wrong..haha. If I could give u rep I would for that! Im going to go though and test the others out. Hopefully I'll have enough caps for some good regulation. As said in my other posts, I need atleast 10,000uF.
[post=8876]Quoted post[/post]​
hi

here's a simple guide for capacitance, for every ampere you'll need 2,500uf, so for your transfor you need 22,500uf. this would prevent your output from sagging once you start drawing large amount of current.

if it can't fully charge, then you have a current leaking caps. the ESR is already high, so it won't endure once you start loading it with high current draw.

an ESR meter can check your caps if it still reliable.

moz
 

Thread Starter

Overclocked2300

Joined Apr 24, 2005
124
Ok..another problem. I measure around 14.5V (after rectification) and when I hook a cap up I get 16.7V, but it increases up to 17V. I thought there could be something wrong with my voltmeter because sometimes it displays nothing at all except values. It usualy displays auto range...etc..
 

mozikluv

Joined Jan 22, 2004
1,437
Originally posted by Overclocked2300@Jul 2 2005, 11:34 PM
Ok..another problem. I measure around 14.5V (after rectification) and when I hook a cap up I get 16.7V, but it increases up to 17V. I thought there could be something wrong with my voltmeter because sometimes it displays nothing at all except values. It usualy displays auto range...etc..
[post=8890]Quoted post[/post]​

variation in your reading at the secondary is the reflection of the variation of your mains. variations on the rectified & filtered output will vary between +/-10% - 15%. you must always consider this factor to arrive at your maximum output voltage. so if your secondary rated output is 12.9vac, at 15% max. variance that would be 14.8vac and the rectified & filtered output will be in the range of 20.9vdc maximum. for the cap voltage at a ratio of 1.5:1 that would be 35v. that will be your minimum cap voltage rating.

moz
 

recca02

Joined Apr 2, 2007
1,214
The out puts are 12.1V @9A, 12.9V@2A, 12.9V@3.2A. My question is, can I connect all the outputs in parallel and get 12V out@14 A?
Even if the voltages were to be same: for same voltages and frequency AFAIK the transformers are loaded equally..thus if three X'er are connected in parallel u'll need 14/3A capacity for each.

There is perhaps a way out of this(not sure though-i'll need some brushing up), I think adding external resistance of specific values to each transformer might work.

Resistance values will have to be calculated based on the current you want the transformer to handle which depends on its individual ratings..
 

Audioguru

Joined Dec 20, 2007
11,249
in 100 watts inverter which transformer was suitable(ie readly available transformer eg;12-0-12 3amp,230v)
12V times 3A (36W) alternates in each half of the center-tapped low voltage winding.
The inverter uses about 20W to heat itself.
Then the output power is only 16W when the little transformer is at its max power rating.

You need a transformer rated at 120VA for a 100W inverter's output.
 
Top