Three Phase Generator

Thread Starter

LEVA

Joined May 29, 2005
2
Hello,
Thinking of purchasing a reconditioned gasoline- motor driven Three Phase Generator.
The voltage output is 110/208Vac. Our intent is to use the Generator as emergency
backup power for our home which is single phase 110-240Vac.
We have been told that by using only two legs of the available power that we will
reduce the total available output current by (Two thirds).
There are Three legs of power with a Return - We can measure 110Vac
between each leg and ground - Can you tell me if this statement is true ??
Thanks, Leon
 

beenthere

Joined Apr 20, 2004
15,819
Hi,

Yes, you will be able to use the generator if you are careful. The windings do give you 115 VAc each, and will work fine for any 115 VAC load up to the rating of the generator's output.

Each voltage peak is only displaced 120 deg. though, so the output will not be suitable for any 220 VAC load you might have. The difference between phases will be less than 200 VAC, and your 220 volt loads will burn up through excessive current draw. That might mean lights and refridgerator, but no air conditioner or oven.
 

Thread Starter

LEVA

Joined May 29, 2005
2
Originally posted by beenthere@May 30 2005, 07:55 PM
Hi,

Yes, you will be able to use the generator if you are careful. The windings do give you 115 VAc each, and will work fine for any 115 VAC load up to the rating of the generator's output.

Each voltage peak is only displaced 120 deg. though, so the output will not be suitable for any 220 VAC load you might have. The difference between phases will be less than 200 VAC, and your 220 volt loads will burn up through excessive current draw. That might mean lights and refridgerator, but no air conditioner or oven.
[post=8075]Quoted post[/post]​
 

thingmaker3

Joined May 16, 2005
5,084
If it were me, I would hold onto my money and look for a more appropriate generator.

Originally posted by beenthere@May 30 2005, 04:55 PM
The difference between phases will be less than 200 VAC, and your 220 volt loads will burn up through excessive current draw.
[post=8075]Quoted post[/post]​
If the impedence of the appliance is unchanged, then wouldn't a drop in applied voltage result in decreased current?
 
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