Question

Thread Starter

loosewire

Joined Apr 25, 2008
1,686
How does a block of marble compare to glass marble.
The block marble is use for counter tops.
Glass marbles is like the marbles we played with as kids.
I want to know if the counter top marble is an
insulator or conductor. explain

Google answered my question,
thanks anyway
 
Last edited:

steveb

Joined Jul 3, 2008
2,436
How does a block of marble compare to glass marble.
The block marble is use for counter tops.
Glass marbles is like the marbles we played with as kids.
I want to know if the counter top marble is an
insulator or conductor. explain
Is this a real question,
or are we reading your poem entitled "Question".

If it's a poem,
I like it.

If it's a question,
the answer is, insulator
because the typical constituents of marble,
dispite the wide variation of constituents
from sample to sample,
have conductivity in the range
we normally classify as insulator.

I hope you liked my poem entitled "Answer"
 

Thread Starter

loosewire

Joined Apr 25, 2008
1,686
Dialog- If I stand on slab of marble and touch
the Loosewire I will be shocked, that makes it
a conductor not an Insulator.What if you could
afford marble floors.Wikipedia mentions rock and
stone when they are describing marble,real
marble.
What got me started on this was the first a/c

unit being a block of marble that was put out

in the cold desert night,and back in building

during the day for cooling. Absorbing heat got

me thinking about conducting in the heat exchange.

Any dialog.
 
Last edited:

TBayBoy

Joined May 25, 2011
148
Isn't marble a constituent of different types of rock, so I don't think there can be one blanket statement about the insulation or conductance, I would figure it varies with the sample.
 

Thread Starter

loosewire

Joined Apr 25, 2008
1,686
If I stood on a marble a floor bare footed I would get shocked.
Just about any type marble would be ground.

Glass marble, glass is made of sand thats a form of ground.
 
Last edited:

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
21,906
A glass marble is Silicon Dioxide, it can melt, but it won't burn.

Marble is Calcium Carbonate, which is pretty active chemically. Then you take a Tums you are eating processed ground calcium carbonate. Really.

Heat marble enough, it will burn, just like coal.
 

steveb

Joined Jul 3, 2008
2,436
What got me started on this was the first a/c

unit being a block of marble that was put out

in the cold desert night,and back in building

during the day for cooling. Absorbing heat got

me thinking about conducting in the heat exchange.

Any dialog.
The a/c properties of marble relate to its heat capacity more than its thermal conductivity. There is a relation between them, but it's not a hard relationship. Thermal and electrical conductivity correlate to a greater extent. The range from conductor to insulator is a broad spectrum extending over something like 40 orders of magnitude.

Something like marble is more in the middle, but leans towards the side of insulators. For, example, it's within 1 or 2 orders of magnitude from deionized water, which is considered an insulator. It's also not too far off from pure silicon which is considered a semiconductor that (when undoped) is not a very good conductor of electricity.
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
21,906
Silicon dioxide (glass) is usually considered a very good insulator. I've handled pure silicon due to my job, while it looks like glass it isn't really.
 
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