Question about BT fibre to home (FTTP) broadband and phone.

Thread Starter

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,897
Does the router supplied support the use of both digital voice phone (Which use a wireless connection to the router.) AND normal phones plugged into sockets on the router or can it only support one of these options ? I have searched BT's website but can't find the answer to this question. I am hoping that someone that has this service can answer the question.

Les.
 
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Ramussons

Joined May 3, 2013
1,321
In India, we have the FTTH ( Fibre To The Home) with various types of NTU's (Network Termination Unit) with or without VOIP built in.
They can have 1 or 2 RJ45 terminals to support 2 separate Internet links, 1 or 2 RJ11 to support 2 separate phones.
Or they come only with RJ45 and no support for phones, or only for 1 Internet link and 1 phone.

I guess you have a choice with BT.
 

Thread Starter

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,897
Thanks for your reply. I was hoping to find someone in the UK that uses this option supplied by BT. Other ISPs use different methods. For example Talktalk provide broadband over fiber but their phone service is still over copper cables.

Les.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
13,711
My observation about Fiber To The Home is that it makes any changes to the location of the modem impossible because of no way to extend the fiber cable to a different location. This has been a rather unfortunate thing for two people I know, since the original location seems to have been selected mostly for the convenience of the installer.
While RG-6 and RG-59 are easily terminated and couplings installed, as well as splitters, fiber optic cables require entirely different tools and a totally new skill set. Also, nether the cable nor the connectors are as available at anything close to a reasonable price.
Besides al of that, every interface between a F/O system and anything else requires a powered interface device, including any splitter to feed multiple locations in a house.
So it seems that the advantage of FTTH to the general public is the elimination of al RFI caused by distribution system leakage.
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
31,112
Does the router supplied support the use of both digital voice phone (Which use a wireless connection to the router.) AND normal phones plugged into sockets on the router or can it only support one of these options ?
What type of wireless phone?
Is it specific to the modem?

I have a 4-phone cordless (landline type) phone system plugged into my Ooma VoIP module, which then connects by WiFi to the modem.
It works great and is cheaper than paying for the VoIP service provided by the cable company.
 
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Thread Starter

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,897
Hi crutschow, My question relates to a fiber broadband and phone package supplied by BT. (The main phone and broadband provider here in the UK.) I have had some replies on the ETO forum that I think have answered my question. I think it is only people here in the UK that have this service installed that can completely answer my question.

Les.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
13,711
Probably my comments about the installation will still apply, and so you do need to consider just where you want that permanent installation to be.
 

shortbus

Joined Sep 30, 2009
9,755
Probably my comments about the installation will still apply, and so you do need to consider just where you want that permanent installation to be.
Around here fiber is just the type of carrier, like cable. After the homes"hub"(don't know the real name, modem maybe?) After that hub it's all WIFI.
 

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
31,112
The LandLine phones are WIFI??? How is that private??
It's my Ooma VoIP module that's connected to WiFi, and the WiFi is configured with a WPA2 15 character security key.
Also I would expect, decoding the Ooma signal would require detailed knowledge of the Ooma encoding method, even if someone could access the WiFi signal.
So that would seem to be pretty private and secure against any but the most sophisticated hackers, certainly more so than a wired POTS connection, which just requires access to the line and a pots phone.

The cordless phones use there own private wireless network to communicate to the cordless base-station, which has a short-wire POTS connection to the Ooma module.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
13,711
It's my Ooma VoIP module that's connected to WiFi, and the WiFi is configured with a WPA2 15 character security key.
Also I would expect, decoding the Ooma signal would require detailed knowledge of the Ooma encoding method, even if someone could access the WiFi signal.
So that would seem to be pretty private and secure against any but the most sophisticated hackers, certainly more so than a wired POTS connection, which just requires access to the line and a pots phone.

The cordless phones use there own private wireless network to communicate to the cordless base-station, which has a short-wire POTS connection to the Ooma module.
OK, it seems that you have it covered for privacy. Much more effort than most take.. I have had two instances where moving the cable modem in clients houses would have been a very handy option, but the fiber optic anchor makes moving it a big deal and adds the cost of a service tech visit.
 

Thread Starter

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,897
I now have the BT FTTP broadband installed so here is an update.
The BT Smart Hub 2 does support the use of the phone port on the router aswell as up to 5 DECT phones.
I was only expecting the phone port to support a single phone as I expected it would not provide enough ring tone signal to drive the ringer circuit of more than one phone.
I monitored the incoming ring signal with the old phone system so I could compare it with the ring signal provided by the BT Smart Hub 2.

Here is the information on the two ring signals.

For phone sevice from exchange via copper wires.

Ring sequence.
Voltages with respect to A line. (Plug pin 5)

Static state of B line -50 volts (Plug pin 2)

Incoming call line goes to about +50 volts with ring tone superimposed on it

Ring frequency about 25 hz (About 53 volts rms.)

T = 0 DC level goes from - 50 to +50 volts
T = 1.60 seconds Start of first ring tone burst.
T = 2.0 seconds end of first ring tone burst
T = 2.2 seconds start of second ring tone burst.
T = 2.66 seconds end of second ring tone burst.
T = 4.7 seconds Start of next pair of bursts.

Gap between pairs of bursts about 2.1 seconds.
This is the waveform.
SDS00003.jpg

For phone port on BT Smart Hub 2.

Ring frequency about 25 hz (About 54 volts rms.)

T = 0 DC level goes from +48 to -48 volts
T = 1.50 seconds Start of first ring tone burst.
T = 1.9 seconds end of first ring tone burst
T = 2.1 seconds start of second ring tone burst.
T = 2.5 seconds end of second ring tone burst.
T = 4.5 seconds Start of next pair of bursts.

Gap between pairs of bursts about 2.0 seconds.
This is the waveform.
SDS00005.jpg
I now have the phone port on the Smart Hub 2 working with two phones and a DECT phone base.

Les.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
13,711
OK, different rings for different lines. That is handy. But as for inside the house I certainly prefer actual wires. I am aware of instances where a malfunction produced so much RFI that not even keyless car door locks would work. And I am well aware of the bad guys using broadband noise to defeat wireless alarm system triggers. So it does not matter how well the wireless is encrypted to keep it private if it is jammed so that it does not work. And in a manufacturing plant a maintenence person arc welding can totally wipe out an area's communications. Real excitement whan THAT happens.
 

Thread Starter

LesJones

Joined Jan 8, 2017
3,897
In the UK copper phone wires are being phased out by the end of 2025 and by then voice over IP will be used. The contract with my internet service provider as about to run out so I moved to a supplier that could provide fiber broadband and phone direct to my house. This has given me an increase in connection speed. ( I am now getting 147 Mbps down load and 31 Mbps upload speeds.)

Les.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
13,711
Certainly the connection speeds described in post #15 are quite fast, but as the content I send and receive is mostly text, it would not matter to me.
But good luck on the new system!
 
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