NV RAM

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Surendar

Joined Sep 12, 2005
18
Ir RAM is Volatile then Could anyone explain what are NVRAM and SRAM and what are the differences between them.

Thanks

Surendar
 

n9352527

Joined Oct 14, 2005
1,198
Originally posted by Surendar@Dec 29 2005, 02:45 PM
Ir RAM is Volatile then Could anyone explain what are NVRAM and SRAM and what are the differences between them.

Thanks

Surendar
[post=12762]Quoted post[/post]​
NVRAM = non-volatile RAM. Usually have a backup battery/cap inside. Doesn't loose the data even when power is removed. Made from SRAM module.

SRAM = static RAM. Fast and volatile. Doesn't require refresh like dynamic RAM. Basically a 6T FF design as opposed to 1T charge storage of DRAM.
 

Dave

Joined Nov 17, 2003
6,970
Cache memory structures tend to be constructed from SRAM due to the faster operation compared to DRAM (SRAM tends to be somewhere between 8 and 16 times faster than DRAM). This is because the basic storage cell of SRAM is the flip-flop which is constructed from anywhere between 4 and 6 transistors, as opposed to DRAM which has a basic storage cell of a single transistor and capacitor. It is clear from this that although SRAM is faster, it doesn't have the density of DRAM and this typically makes it more expensive.

Dave
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
13,471
Originally posted by Dave@Dec 29 2005, 05:37 PM
Cache memory structures tend to be constructed from SRAM due to the faster operation compared to DRAM (SRAM tends to be somewhere between 8 and 16 times faster than DRAM). This is because the basic storage cell of SRAM is the flip-flop which is constructed from anywhere between 4 and 6 transistors, as opposed to DRAM which has a basic storage cell of a single transistor and capacitor. It is clear from this that although SRAM is faster, it doesn't have the density of DRAM and this typically makes it more expensive.

Dave
[post=12775]Quoted post[/post]​
NVRAM can also be made of Electrically Eraseable or Flash Memory cells. They often have a serial SPI or similar interface. They typically have "read" times in the nanosecond/microsecond range while the "write" times might be in the milliseconds range. In this case you would consider them a read mostly/write occasionally type device.
 
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