No more specification other than ampere rating.

Thread Starter

Lightfire

Joined Oct 5, 2010
690
Hello folks,

I am searching the internet and finally found the fuse that best suits me.

But sadly, there is no more specification listed in the Web site other than the ampere rating.

The ampere rating was 500 milliamperes and its size was 20 millimeter.

Please refer to this link: http://www.rshelectronics.co.uk/product.php?id_product=213

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

Lightfire
 
Last edited:

SgtWookie

Joined Jul 17, 2007
22,210
You need a fuse that has a voltage rating greater (higher) than the voltage in the circuit that you are using it with. If you are using a 12v lead-acid battery, then that fuse would certainly be rated for at least 12 volts.

You missed the "quick blow" specification. That would be fine for LEDs, but if you were using incandescent lamps, the fuse may blow when you first apply power. You would use a "slow blow" type fuse with incandescent lamps and motors.
 

mcgyvr

Joined Oct 15, 2009
5,394
Good chance its rated to 125 to 250V. (most fuses like that are)
A 1/2A glass fuse is actually easy to come by... (in the US anyways)
 

Thread Starter

Lightfire

Joined Oct 5, 2010
690
You need a fuse that has a voltage rating greater (higher) than the voltage in the circuit that you are using it with. If you are using a 12v lead-acid battery, then that fuse would certainly be rated for at least 12 volts.

You missed the "quick blow" specification. That would be fine for LEDs, but if you were using incandescent lamps, the fuse may blow when you first apply power. You would use a "slow blow" type fuse with incandescent lamps and motors.
But how did you know that it is fine to apply with a 12 volt battery? I want to know.

Lightfire
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
22,155
You can use a 120VAC fuse with 12V, but not the other way around. This is true of most electronic components, a 35V capacitor will replace a 25V capacitor.
 

Thread Starter

Lightfire

Joined Oct 5, 2010
690
Okay. The purpose is to melt down the fuse due to high current flowing through it. It might looks nonsense but I really want to see a fuse melting in real life.:D

Okay, please refer to the schematic I attached.

As you may see, there were three lamps rated as 6 volts, 0.5 amperes wired in parallel. So, total all, the three lamps were pulling 1.5 amperes. By that, it will cause the fuse to melt down.:D

The battery that I will use is indicated on the schematic. And the fuse that I will use would be the one that I have asked.

So folks, do you think it will happen, I mean will the fuse melt down?

Lightfire
 

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Last edited:

tom66

Joined May 9, 2009
2,595
One of the fuses will melt first, the other will be fine. (It would be unlikely for both to fail simultaneously, unless it was a gross overload.)
 

mcgyvr

Joined Oct 15, 2009
5,394
With 1.5A running through it the fuse will blow in approx one tenth of a second (.1 seconds)
Don't waste your time.. Its not going to be anything more than a really quick small flash of light.. if that.
 

SgtWookie

Joined Jul 17, 2007
22,210
It won't be very exciting, but it will be an expensive 1/10 second!

If you could instead make the income of what the fuse cost every 1/10 second, you would be a wealthy person in the not too distant future. If the fuse cost $0.10 USD, that would be an income of $3,600 per hour or $7,200,000 per year!
 

tom66

Joined May 9, 2009
2,595
I once put about 10A through a cheap multimeter on the mA range and it lit up the casing of the meter very bright, but it did its job (meter worked fine after fuse replaced.)
 

wmodavis

Joined Oct 23, 2010
739
Here is a good statement on fuse voltage rating from Littlefuse contained in Littelfuse Electronic Fuse Products Catalog.

"VOLTAGE RATING: The voltage rating, as marked on a
fuse, indicates that the fuse can be relied upon to safely
interrupt its rated short circuit current in a circuit where the
voltage is equal to, or less than, its rated voltage.
This system of voltage rating is covered by N.E.C.
regulations and is a requirement of Underwriters
Laboratories as a protection against fire risk. The standard
voltage ratings used by fuse manufacturers for most small dimension
and midget fuses are 32, 63, 125, 250 and 600.
In electronic equipment with relatively low output power
supplies, with circuit impedance limiting short circuit
currents to values of less than ten times the current rating
of the fuse, it is common practice to specify fuses with
125 or 250 volt ratings for secondary circuit protection of
500 volts or higher.
As mentioned previously (See RERATING), fuses are
sensitive to changes in current, not voltage, maintaining
their “status quo” at any voltage up to the maximum rating
of the fuse. It is not until the fuse element melts and
arcing occurs that the circuit voltage and available power
become an issue.
The safe interruption of the circuit, as it
relates to circuit voltage and available power, is discussed
in the section on INTERRUPTING RATING.
To summarize, a fuse may be used at any voltage that is
less than its voltage rating without detriment to its fusing
characteristics. Please contact the factory for applications
at voltages greater than the voltage rating."
================
Bold emphasis added by me.

Another good article is Littlefuse "Fuseology" found in "OE101-C - Automotive OEM Catalog"
 
Last edited:

PatM

Joined Dec 31, 2010
86
As questioned above, only one fuse in the Positive line is necessary.
No need for 2 fuses in series in that circuit.
 
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