Newbie need help identifying basic potentiometer

Thread Starter

foruuser

Joined Oct 31, 2021
50

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bertus

Joined Apr 5, 2008
21,854
Hello,

The .20 is a panel mount potmeter.
The .37 is a PCB mounted potmeter.
The function will be the same, but the mounting is totaly different.

Bertus
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
4,123
The 10K pot that you have will fit into a breadboard if that is what you are trying to do. It's a tight fit but I do it often. Since you said Arduino that means
40mA * 5V = 200mW MAX so just about any pot is good for 1/4 Watt and you have no problems. I also use:
IMG_0842[1].JPG
The ones one the left can be had in a multi-value kit cheaply. The one on the right is a Bourns multiturn trimmer pot. Both are screwdriver/tweaker adjusted. Both fit easily into a breadboard with minimal space used compared to the full-size pots. There is one like on the left with a handle but takes up more board space to mount. All can be found on AliX.
IMG_0843[1].JPG
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
11,582
Is either one of those presently in an operational circuit where you hope to use the other device? IF SO, WHAT IS THE VOLTAGE BETWEEN TERMINALS 1 AND 3. That will tell how much power is present and let us know if any limits would be exceeded. And a question about what the use will be, will the pot have a knob and be adjusted all the time, like a volume control, or will it be set once and possibly be adjusted again some time?
 

Thread Starter

foruuser

Joined Oct 31, 2021
50
thanks for the info,
I am going to make a pcb version of my breadboard so I'm looking for a large slide switch or a flat switch i cant seem to find a aliX 5mm big slide switch support, they are all tiny, this switch is used on arduino 5v, yes it will be adjusted all the time because it selects between steps 1-8 and 9-16 to edit a sequence.
 

SamR

Joined Mar 19, 2019
4,123
Can't tell without some detail on the backside terminal and spacing. But, that is typically mounted on a panel with spade connectors on wires plugged onto the terminals.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
11,582
can you place a switch like this through a pcb?
or is that a nono
That sort of switch latches into a hole in a panel. It can wire to a PCB, but not mount to it directly. And the force to operate it would soon damage the circuit board. And exposed circuit boards are only for hobby experimenting use, real equipment is enclosed in a protective case of some kind.
 

Thread Starter

foruuser

Joined Oct 31, 2021
50
ok thanks for info
I have another question I am using blue resistors with color lines on them and capacitors that are orange circular with numbers on them, If I switch these for the modern tiny little ones that are soldered on the pcb, does that work? Are they exactly similar in functionality and compatibility? thanks
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
11,582
If the resistor value and power rating are the same then a surface mount resistor will work the same. With capacitors it is more complex because there are several more variables to capacitor characteristics. In addition to capacitance and voltage rating there are dielectric properties that matter quite a bit. But the short answer about capacitors is "usually" they can be substituted for with surface mount equivalents.
 

Thread Starter

foruuser

Joined Oct 31, 2021
50
ok thanks,
the capacitor used that is old school is 50v 4.7nf with 473 written on it ceramic, when I seek a surface mount one it becomes
  • 4.7UF 16V 475, would that be compatible?
  • for the resistor it starts with the old school model that is 2W and then when i search surface mount theres 1/4 or 1/8 watt only available
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
11,582
For the resistor, if the "2W" is a power rating, then there is a problem because that implies a resistor able to dissipate 2 watts of heat, So now the question becomes how much power that resistor ACTUALLY handles. So without seeing the circuit we need to know the value of the resistor and the voltage across it.
For the capacitor, the big question is the voltage rating, because the value will be OK.
So now the question is what sort of circuit is this?? If the power level or voltages are what the circuit requires then the much smaller parts will not be suitable, but if the part ratings are just what was found then there is a good chance that some substitutions could work.
But without some information there is no way to provide a reasonable answer.
 
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