Need help identifying a blown resistor on Ironman treadmill's Keys Health 08-0158

Thread Starter

DavidHo2014

Joined Jun 8, 2014
2
My Ironman treadmill 220ct stopped working. The controller board, Keys Health 08-0158, has a blown resistor and I cannot identify its value. Would someone who has this controller please post the value of resistor R64. I also attached a picture of the controller from its manual in case someone can see the resistor better than I. Resistor R64 is between the two relays at the lower left. Thanks, David.
 

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Thread Starter

DavidHo2014

Joined Jun 8, 2014
2
Thanks Lestraveled, but my resistor was completely burnt to dust. I should have mentioned the picture I showed is from the manual, not the actual image of my board. Thanks, David.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
25,226
In a pinch you may have to do a little reverse engineering!
Being so close to the relays, I am guessing the resistor has some kind of connection to them, it looks like a through-hole resistor so it probably carried a little current.
Try following the traces and see what it was connected to.
Max.
 

THE_RB

Joined Feb 11, 2008
5,438
Looks to be a fusible resistor and "burnt to dust" matches that.

And the photo shows a gold band, which is used on resistors in the 1.0 to 8.2 ohms range.

They are generally low ohms, maybe 1 ohm or 2.2 ohms. It's a cheap way of getting "fuse" protection for some power section of the circuit.

In a pinch you can replace with a slow blow 2.5A fuse or similar and test the unit. If the fuse blows straight away you know the fault condition that blew the fusible resistor is still faulty!
 

Gwizzle

Joined Jan 22, 2016
2
Looks to be a fusible resistor and "burnt to dust" matches that.

And the photo shows a gold band, which is used on resistors in the 1.0 to 8.2 ohms range.

They are generally low ohms, maybe 1 ohm or 2.2 ohms. It's a cheap way of getting "fuse" protection for some power section of the circuit.

In a pinch you can replace with a slow blow 2.5A fuse or similar and test the unit. If the fuse blows straight away you know the fault condition that blew the fusible resistor is still faulty!
Just wondering if you came up with the right resister? I have the same problem, and need a little help. Thanks
 
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