insulation voltage of water

Thread Starter

kubeek

Joined Sep 20, 2005
5,587
Does anyone know this constant for pure water? I mean the voltage at which the water ionizates and becomes much more conductive.
Thanks
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
12,302
Originally posted by kubeek@Apr 15 2006, 05:41 AM
Does anyone know this constant for pure water? I mean the voltage at which the water ionizates and becomes much more conductive.
Thanks
[post=16197]Quoted post[/post]​
Many chemical compounds, like salt NaCl, split into ions when they go into solution in a solvent like water. In the case of water, I'm not sure how you can make it turn into ions with just an electric current. If you can pull the two hydrogen atoms away from the oxygen with an electric current, I think you get Hydrogen gas and Oxygen gas, not Hydrogen Ions and Oxygen Ions. I don't have even a clue as to how much this would take, except to note that the chemical bonds which hold water together are very strong and very stable.
 

Thread Starter

kubeek

Joined Sep 20, 2005
5,587
Originally posted by Papabravo@Apr 17 2006, 01:04 AM
Many chemical compounds, like salt NaCl, split into ions when they go into solution in a solvent like water. In the case of water, I'm not sure how you can make it turn into ions with just an electric current. If you can pull the two hydrogen atoms away from the oxygen with an electric current, I think you get Hydrogen gas and Oxygen gas, not Hydrogen Ions and Oxygen Ions. I don't have even a clue as to how much this would take, except to note that the chemical bonds which hold water together are very strong and very stable.
[post=16233]Quoted post[/post]​
Yes, I didn´t think about this. So do you think that it is possible for the water to ionisate by "jump" with some diluted chemicals, or it should conduct liearily with rising voltage?
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
12,302
Originally posted by kubeek@Apr 17 2006, 03:48 PM
Yes, I didn´t think about this. So do you think that it is possible for the water to ionisate by "jump" with some diluted chemicals, or it should conduct liearily with rising voltage?
[post=16256]Quoted post[/post]​
I truly do not know
 

windoze killa

Joined Feb 23, 2006
605
Originally posted by kubeek@Apr 15 2006, 08:41 PM
Does anyone know this constant for pure water? I mean the voltage at which the water ionizates and becomes much more conductive.
Thanks
[post=16197]Quoted post[/post]​
If it is "pure water" as you say it is non conductive. If it starts to ionise then it is no longer pure. The moment you put a wire in the water to apply the voltage then contaminants from the wires wil pass to the water. It will all depend on the contaminants and the amount.
 

treedog

Joined Apr 23, 2006
15
Originally posted by kubeek@Apr 15 2006, 05:41 AM
Does anyone know this constant for pure water? I mean the voltage at which the water ionizates and becomes much more conductive.
Thanks
[post=16197]Quoted post[/post]​
o'm not sure about this but and don't quote me here but somewhere i heard or read of a process of super heating water some how way beyond steam and it ionised does any 1 remeber that it was like about 5 urs back at sandia labs i think?
 

Yeti

Joined Jul 26, 2005
35
I do remember from chemistry in high school that a 9volt batery submerged in water will produce hydrogen gas from the Negative terminal and Oxygen gas from the positive.*

*Hydrogen maybe postive and Oxygen Negative cant remember

In the class we used two test tubes filled with water and put them over each terminal of the 9 volt battery submerged in water in a beaker. From there we used the Pop test for checking which was teh hydrogen.
 
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