Inducing A/C current

Thread Starter

FEATHERTOP

Joined May 3, 2006
1
Hi everyone

Does anyone know how to induce an AC current into a liquid in a pipe. I know that it can be done by a transformer and a primary coil, the pipe becoming the secondary one. but can it be done by inducing the current by say radar of electromagnetic radiation.

Many thanks

Feathertop
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
13,559
Originally posted by FEATHERTOP@May 3 2006, 06:59 PM
Hi everyone

Does anyone know how to induce an AC current into a liquid in a pipe. I know that it can be done by a transformer and a primary coil, the pipe becoming the secondary one. but can it be done by inducing the current by say radar of electromagnetic radiation.

Many thanks

Feathertop
[post=16775]Quoted post[/post]​
Pipes are not coils. The whole concept sounds dubious. Is the idea to "move" the liquid or propagate the current?
 

beenthere

Joined Apr 20, 2004
15,819
Hi,

If water was a conductor, there would be no problem. As Papabravo said, water is not a conductor. You can add electrolytes to it to make it conduct a current, but it does not become a conductor.

Induction works when lines of magnetic force cut a conductor. You can make some current flow by using a copper prpe, but not in the water. If you do make this happen, though, the Navy will want to talk and pay you lots of money.
 

beenthere

Joined Apr 20, 2004
15,819
Hi again,

You said "liquid". Use mercury and a plastic pipe. If you wind the pipe into a coil, you can magnify the effect. Copper is cheaper and not so dangerous.
 

thingmaker3

Joined May 16, 2005
5,084
Actually, a conductive pipe would be a secondary with one turn. This is the same concept used in induction heating. Some induction heating set-ups do indeed have a refractory channel, surrounded by a work coil, that liquid metal moves through.
 
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