I am a hardware board design engineer, and I want to move to Analog IC design. Will a part-time PhD help me in this?

Thread Starter

hoyyoth

Joined Mar 21, 2020
307
Dear Team,

This is not related to any circuit design.I need your opinion.My question is given below.

I am a hardware board design engineer, and I want to move to Analog IC design. Will a part-time PhD help me in this?

May I know whether industry consider part time PhD holders.

Regards
H
 

Thread Starter

hoyyoth

Joined Mar 21, 2020
307
What's a "part-time PhD"?
A part-time PhD would enable you to acquire your doctorate degree while pursuing a full-time job. It is of a longer duration spanning around 6 to 8 years while a regular doctoral degree might be somewhere between 3 to 5 years.
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
29,823
You need to be a bit careful in deciding whether or not to get a PhD in industry. Many employers looking to higher engineers will not consider those that hold a PhD, or at least consider them less favorably. There is a pretty wide perception that a person with a PhD is going to be expecting a much higher salary and is stove piped very deep in one narrow area of focus, so unless they happen to be looking for an expert in an area tightly aligned with your dissertation topic, they may not consider your application seriously. This is certainly not to say that every employer feels that way, but it is pretty commonplace.

As far as part-time versus full-time, that's a nonissue. Once you have a degree, hardly anyone is going to care how long it took you to get it.

The best way to get analog IC design experience is by designing analog ICs. Look for companies that do that work and apply to them. You don't need to already be an analog IC designer -- they are used to not being able to find people with experience in that area and so they know that you will need to gain experience and come up to speed while on the job. Certainly, the more analog experience you have, even as a hobbyist, the better. Small companies tend to be better than big companies for getting experience quickly -- at a large company you can get trapped in a niche where you become the guy that designs a particular type of filter day in and day out, while at a small company you end up doing whatever is needed on the current project.
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
20,978
I would say no, since a PhD is mostly suited to those who wish to pursue a career in academia. There are exceptions, but that is the general trend. A better approach IMHO is to get a masters degree in EE with an emphasis on analog circuits.
 
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dl324

Joined Mar 30, 2015
16,644
A part-time PhD would enable you to acquire your doctorate degree while pursuing a full-time job.
Until you get your PhD, you're considered masters level.

80-90% of the people in my last group had PhD's. Someone with an associates degree, intelligence, and experience could have done most of the jobs. The problem is that most recruiters (in large companies) won't consider anyone with less than a masters degree.
 

Thread Starter

hoyyoth

Joined Mar 21, 2020
307
I would say no, since a PhD is mostly suited to those who wish to pursue a career in academia. There are exceptions, but that is the general trend. A better approach IMHO is to get a masters degree in EE with an emphasis on analog circuits.
Thank you.
Why I thought of PhD is mainly for career change and obviously I am interested in Analog IC design.

For the past 10 years I am working as Hardware Board design engineer.I have good experience in analog board level design.(Design using Opamps,ADC's,MOS,DC-DC etc).

I tried to move to analog ic design domain,but companies are not ready to accept beacuse my past experience is in Hardware board design.(This is the situation in my country)

So I thought of doing PhD in Analog IC design and move to that area.
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
29,823
I tried to move to analog ic design domain,but companies are not ready to accept beacuse my past experience is in Hardware board design.(This is the situation in my country)
The situations are different in different countries -- and you give no indication of what country "my country" refers to.

Identify company's that do what you want to do try to identify a few people there that make these kinds of hiring decisions. The get in touch with them and see what their advice is.
 

Thread Starter

hoyyoth

Joined Mar 21, 2020
307
The situations are different in different countries -- and you give no indication of what country "my country" refers to.

Identify company's that do what you want to do try to identify a few people there that make these kinds of hiring decisions. The get in touch with them and see what their advice is.
Definitely ,I will contact some hiring managers.
I am from India
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
10,117
Interview some, make an offer if you see somebody who looks promising, but you should also be thinking about whether his career needs can be filled by your company when he gets his PhD.

I have worked with several PhD’s in industry and many of them moved into management for the money (at least in my way of thinking) as quickly as they could. One went on to be a valuable consultant, which worked out well because he specialized knowledge that I didn't need all that often.
 
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