How to generate gerber files in Eagle

Thread Starter

Gajyamadake

Joined Oct 9, 2019
144
I think I have finished my small design in Eagle, Now I need to generate gerber files before sending it to fabrication house

take look at this screenshot and let me know if anything missing in design ?

1571918786633.png
 

SLK001

Joined Nov 29, 2011
1,532
I think I have finished my small design in Eagle, Now I need to generate gerber files before sending it to fabrication house

take look at this screenshot and let me know if anything missing in design ?
I'd say you are no where near being finished. Gerber files are created by the CAM processor.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
8,099
Agree with SLK001. For one thing, your board needs an outline. Otherwise, you could end up receiving a very big PCB, but more likely, the board house will find the error and not process your order without more information.
 

Thread Starter

Gajyamadake

Joined Oct 9, 2019
144
I'd say you are no where near being finished.
You didn't tell me what I am missing

Gerber files are created by the CAM processor.
Yes I am reading this page https://support.jlcpcb.com/article/43-how-to-export-eagle-pcb-to-gerber-files

Update :
Agree with SLK001. For one thing, your board needs an outline. Otherwise, you could end up receiving a very big PCB, but more likely, the board house will find the error and not process your order without more information.
@jpanhalt Done in design

1571921904103.png
 
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jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
8,099
It appears you are using a newer version of Eagle than I use.

1) Have you checked it with the board house? Some houses will require a two-sided board unless specified for one-sided, which might cost more. Easy to add a second side. Just make a polygon pour and name it something ("GND" is common, but not required).
2) Similar to #1, you may want to consider a copper pour on the top side. You seem to have your traces and components on the same side. That can be done, but for through-hole components, one often sees the components on top and routing on bottom.
3) What is the width of the connections? They look quite thin, and there is no real advantage to doing that. So, I would make them at 24 mil (0.6 mm) or larger.
4) Edit: be sure your labeling ("silkscreen") is readable and sufficiently large/thick to be easily read.
 

Thread Starter

Gajyamadake

Joined Oct 9, 2019
144
It appears you are using a newer version of Eagle than I use.

1) Have you checked it with the board house? Some houses will require a two-sided board unless specified for one-sided, which might cost more. Easy to add a second side. Just make a polygon pour and name it something ("GND" is common, but not required).
@jpanhalt big thank you for helping me

I am learning PCB designing so I started to make very small design. I am not fully ready to make good design. I am just practicing. so when I will have hands on experience in PCB design I will make my own and will send it two fabrication house

2) Similar to #1, you may want to consider a copper pour on the top side. You seem to have your traces and components on the same side. That can be done, but for through-hole components, one often sees the components on top and routing on bottom.
Yes I am trying fix this issue. I went through auto routing option

3) What is the width of the connections?
4) Edit: be sure your labeling ("silkscreen") is readable and sufficiently large/thick to be easily read.
I am using below parameters

1571925691572.png
 
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Thread Starter

Gajyamadake

Joined Oct 9, 2019
144
2) Similar to #1, you may want to consider a copper pour on the top side. You seem to have your traces and components on the same side. That can be done, but for through-hole components, one often sees the components on top and routing on bottom.
I want to make on single layer PCB component on the top side and traces on the bottom side

I tried different settings

Top to *, and Bottom to N/A
Top to N/A, and Bottom to Auto
Top to N/A, and Bottom to * reference links http://101eagle.blogspot.com/2009/12/eagle-autoroute-one-layer.html


1571928787693.png

. But both are not working. I still traces and components on the top side
 
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SLK001

Joined Nov 29, 2011
1,532
My advice is to ditch the autorouter. Do all of your routing BY HAND. That way, you'll get your board the way YOU want it. You need to post check plots. Check plots are images of TOP METAL (WITH VIAS AND HOLES), TOP PLACE, BOTTOM METAL (AGAIN WITH VIAS AND HOLES), BOTTOM PLACE AND ALL SILKSCREEN LAYERS, all of these with the BOARD DIMENSION LAYER.
 

Thread Starter

Gajyamadake

Joined Oct 9, 2019
144
I have spent an hour to set single layer PCB design followed this video
but still I am getting component and traces at top. I do not understand why It's happening
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
8,099
I use red for top and blue for bottom. That was default Eagle for my version. The colors really don't matter so long as they are defined "top" and "bottom" and are different. Parts by default are on top, but that can be changed too.

In manual routing mode, when you click on the routing tool:
1571934970313.png
in my version, there will be a window above it that will be one of those colors typically in the two-layer-board limited versions. Click on the dropdown next to it and select bottom. Then route away. On a more advanced board, you may want parts on the bottom. Chose the "mirror" tool and click on the part. That puts it on the bottom.

Here's an example:
1571935549203.png

E$1 is an 8-pin dip that was put on the bottom by mirroring. E$2 is on top. I routed before mirroring, and when I mirrored E$1, the trace going to E$2 automatically inserted a via and routed on top (side opposite the device) too. Note that the label for E$1 is also mirrored. Also, notice the small connection between the two adjacent pins. That is on bottom, and I could have changed the short segment on top to bottom too, but left it to illustrate the difference. It is better to put parts on the bottom before routing them so you will not have to fix those changes. An "X" over a route will indicate an error, such as a layer violation.

With autorouting, you can chose the layer too, but I very rarely use autorouting.
 
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jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
8,099
Yes, the manual can help, and I don't know how big the Autodesk manual is. The version I started with pre-Autodesk was more than 250 pages, and the "tutorial" was more than 50 pages. I am a firm believer that practice is the best way to learn a program. This little project is perfect for that. Sure, the TS should look through the tutorial, if there is one, but for me, the manual per se is a reference document of "how to" when I have a more specific problem. Once he/she has the design down, then reading the tutorial on exporting the Gerbers/Drill files will help.

My advice is for the TS to play with the tool buttons. Hopefully Autodesk has not subscribed to the same philosophy that SolidWorks followed and leaves icons in the same place regardless of context. (FWIW, I spent more time on SolidWorks looking for icons than I spent time designing. Stopped my subscription in 2007.)
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
6,499
Generating usable Gerber files with the latest Eagle 9.5.1 version is easy. It creates a manufacturing zip file that most houses can use make your board. With the correct parameters for the board
auto-routing works just fine.




Manufactures like OSH Park will accept the zip file.
 
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