How do you come up with your own circuit?

Thread Starter

stanman11

Joined Nov 23, 2010
228
I want to make my own circuit but im not sure exactly where to begin.
How do i know weather to put the resistor there or capacitor there or diode way over wonder?

If I want my circuit to do something specific like control a servo with an automatic reset Where would I look?
 

#12

Joined Nov 30, 2010
18,210
Start with exactly what you want to accomplish. That will point to the methods, materials, and precision you will need to use.

For a servo with a reset, get the specifications of the servo and design something to drive it. When you get done with that, you will understand the circuit well enough to know exactly where is the best place to install the reset button.
 

Thread Starter

stanman11

Joined Nov 23, 2010
228
I have a traxxas servo and 10f200 PIC's with a china based programmer.
From there im lost. I guess first i should study the chips data sheet?
 

#12

Joined Nov 30, 2010
18,210
Study the chip's datasheet and you will probably find that a logic chip can not drive a servo. Get the specifications for the servo and design something that has enough power to drive it. When you get done with that, you will understand the circuit well enough to see how to make a reset.
 

colinb

Joined Jun 15, 2011
351
Do you know how write programs for a PIC? If not, make that your first task. Get a “Hello, World” program of some sort working on the PIC. For instance, make the classic “blinking LED” application. Get very familiar with the PIC. I don't know much about PICs (I'm an AVR/ARM guy mostly), but I think the 10F series might not support C, only assembly language?

Then after you have some basic test programs of the PIC working, you can set about controlling the Hobby servos are controlled using a pulse-width modulation (PWM) signal, so learn about PWM and servo control. You'll have to write a PIC program to generate pulses of the proper length, at the proper interval to control the servo.

Play and have fun!
 

colinb

Joined Jun 15, 2011
351
Study the chip's datasheet and you will probably find that a logic chip can not drive a servo. Get the specifications for the servo and design something that has enough power to drive it.
No, that's not true. The servo will have power (e.g., +6 V), ground, and signal connections. The PIC would only drive the signal connection, which takes nearly no current. The servo contains the electronics to read the signal and use the power input to drive the motor itself.
 

Thread Starter

stanman11

Joined Nov 23, 2010
228
No, that's not true. The servo will have power (e.g., +6 V), ground, and signal connections. The PIC would only drive the signal connection, which takes nearly no current. The servo contains the electronics to read the signal and use the power input to drive the motor itself.
Oh sounds easy :(
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
22,164
So far good advice, nothing I would argue with.

Part of it is experience, but as has been mentioned, define what you want to do. The better and tighter the definition, the more likely you can reach the point you want to go.
 
Try designing to a "black box" . This allows you to start with a somewhat vague idea. Start with a single block. You only need an input, output and a power source (battery,wall outlet, etc). Work on defining these three things and you might have project.
 

Thread Starter

stanman11

Joined Nov 23, 2010
228
im trying to write a servo command

center to left center to right.


What should the program codes look like when finished?
 
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