History of this site

Thread Starter

uzair

Joined Dec 26, 2007
110
Actually, tommorow i saw the last page on the forums and there were posts dated "1970".What is this?
I mean, what is the history of this site?
 

Dave

Joined Nov 17, 2003
6,960
Actually, tommorow i saw the last page on the forums and there were posts dated "1970".What is this?
I mean, what is the history of this site?
We were the first website on the net!

Seriously, the 1970 posts are errors resulting from the forums transition from Invision to vBulletin in 2006. The site went live in May 2003, the initial forums went active in late 2003.

Dave
 

Thread Starter

uzair

Joined Dec 26, 2007
110
Ok- ok- So those were fake.I just have a habit of becoming excited.
 

Dave

Joined Nov 17, 2003
6,960
I think 1/1/1970 is when Unix Time started. It is supposed to roll over in 2038, the so called Y2K38 problem. Thirty years to go and counting.

http://vancouver-webpages.com/time/Y2K38.html
That might be a plausible explanation for the seemingly random 1/1/70 date. As a guess when the boards were transferred from Invision to vBulletin, certain threads (of a certain early period of the forums) did not have a date-stamp - therefore a standard date 1/1/70 was used in place.

The Y2K38 problem looks as much of a non-starter as the Y2K problem. Actually there was a millennium bug - Windows ME!! :D

Dave
 

recca02

Joined Apr 2, 2007
1,211
Actually, tommorow i saw the last page on the forums and there were posts dated "1970".What is this?
I mean, what is the history of this site?
while i dont mean an offense..but in light humour:
what freaks me out is that he saw it tommorow.

actually this is a big problem in the subcontinent..since we have the same word for yesterday and tomorrow.ppl often wrongly use the latter for the former.

The Y2K38 problem looks as much of a non-starter as the Y2K problem. Actually there was a millennium bug - Windows ME!!
i agree...esp with the latter part:D
 

Dave

Joined Nov 17, 2003
6,960
while i dont mean an offense..but in light humour:
what freaks me out is that he saw it tommorow.

actually this is a big problem in the subcontinent..since we have the same word for yesterday and tomorrow.ppl often wrongly use the latter for the former.
I missed that one. How strange that the same word is used for closely related, but polar, words. I am not surprised there was some confusion.

i agree...esp with the latter part:D
Ahhh, someone else who suffered! I hated it, thankfully XP came along little over a year later.

Dave
 

Thread Starter

uzair

Joined Dec 26, 2007
110
while i dont mean an offense..but in light humour:
what freaks me out is that he saw it tommorow.

actually this is a big problem in the subcontinent..since we have the same word for yesterday and tomorrow.ppl often wrongly use the latter for the former.

Actually, english is not our native language so these mistakes are "must"(almost).;)
 

beenthere

Joined Apr 20, 2004
15,808
I would have asked for clarification too. In 1970, PDP-11's were hot. There was no internet. The closest thing to a desktop computer I was aware of was a Data General Supernova, which need a manually entered boot loader. 8" floppies were revolutionary. TSO was the way you logged onto the mainframe, and the IBM 370 was king. Hard disks were either Winchesters, or separate peripherals that weighed hundreds of pounds, with a couple of megabyte capacities. Univac was still building octal-organized computers. I had a friend working for Martin-Marietta who had to hand select TTL chips that would clock at 40 MHz. NSA still had a plugboard programmed computer running.
 

Dave

Joined Nov 17, 2003
6,960
Actually, english is not our native language so these mistakes are "must"(almost).;)
:D Don't worry about it, I didn't even notice!

I would have asked for clarification too. In 1970, PDP-11's were hot. There was no internet. The closest thing to a desktop computer I was aware of was a Data General Supernova, which need a manually entered boot loader. 8" floppies were revolutionary. TSO was the way you logged onto the mainframe, and the IBM 370 was king. Hard disks were either Winchesters, or separate peripherals that weighed hundreds of pounds, with a couple of megabyte capacities. Univac was still building octal-organized computers. I had a friend working for Martin-Marietta who had to hand select TTL chips that would clock at 40 MHz. NSA still had a plugboard programmed computer running.
Just shows you how advanced we are here at AAC!

Dave
 
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