Grammar rule or way of saying

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
8,491
I say the letters, always. Makes it hard to misunderstand, be it LED or USB or PSU (think how that last would sound pronounced).
Bill, I believe some of the others on this forum disagree with you on how to pronounce LED.

Ratch said:
The best rule I can think of is don't let the consonant "n" in "an" flow into another consonant, and don't let the "a" in "a" flow into a another vowel. So "an LED" is a no-no. By the way, speaking of grammar, "english grammar" is "English grammar" because "English" is a nationality, and is always capitalized in the King's English.

Ratch
He clarified that statement by pointing out that he pronounced LED as a single word, like the element lead. Others also claimed to do that.

Frankly, I agree with you on the pronunciation, but it is a matter of choice. I would find it a bit inconsistent, if someone pronounced LED as a single word, and IRED or UVED weree pronounced by saying the letters.

John
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
21,929
Yes, I know. But if someone pronounced LED led, either I would pick it up in context or not know what the heck he was talking about. Most folks go with what is obvious. I know I'm just one small part of the world, but I've never heard it done on a factory floor or school that way. I've never heard USB pronounced any other way either. If someone tried I'd probably make them spell it out to know what they were saying.

Somehow I doubt that is going to change, just like you will never see me spell LED led. The only real acronym I know that isn't the formal grammer rule on is laser.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
8,491
Agree, I have never heard those acronyms pronounced any other way than by the letters.

My attorney had a question about his computer. He pronounced PSU as "sue." :D

John
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
21,929
Add a "P" to that, and you see why I don't pronounce it that way. :rolleyes:

But I think my original point is valid, be it "Bard's" or "King" or "American" english, spelling of acronyms requires capitalization, which in turn hints at pronunciation.

In the scheme of things it doesn't matter. I disagree with english professors, people dictate language, and it evolves to suit the people speaking it. We all have a vote, but very little say.
 

jpanhalt

Joined Jan 18, 2008
8,491
One of the really nice things about our language that is appreciated by good teachers and editors is its ability to change. Nouns become verbs, acronyms become regular words, it accepts foreign words readily, and proper nouns may eventually lose that distinction. Thus, we have radar, sonar, gram stain (verb, although some pedantics still insist on Gram's stain), gram-negative, honcho, fax (as a verb), and so on. We can even end a sentence with a preposition, if we want to.

Have a great day.

John
 
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