Give me an estimate of how long it will take

killivolt

Joined Jan 10, 2010
781
Not sure why you posted this Thread but, education, work, family, friends, acquaintances, notice my turtle? Life in general if I can will be approached at my pace and not the worlds pace If I can manage it, I hate working on projects with a timeline, but I will say if it’s something I really want to do, it’s done first, and if it’s something I really really want to do, I bleed it out to the end because I know when it’s finished I can’t work on it anymore. lol

Why do something when you can mull it around in your head and do it better.


kv
 

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
1,062
As a technical consultant and project engineer, I learned very early in my career to ask several questions when I was assigned a task.
The first one was "When is this needed by?". Their answer was always "yesterday" so I had to reset their expectations to get a reasonable answer. Once I knew that, I could starts a feasibility study to see if the task could be done with the available time, resources and limitations, before I made any commitment..
The second one was "How important is it, compared to the tasks you have already assigned me". If you don't establish that, you will never be able to fit them all into your schedule and you will never deliver any on time.
Now I am retired, and spend most of my time doing graphic arts and tinkering with electronics. My schedules are flexible, dependent mostly on delivery times of ordered components but I still ask those questions when my wife assigns me any new tasks.
Regards,
Keith
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
13,961
As a technical consultant and project engineer, I learned very early in my career to ask several questions when I was assigned a task.
The first one was "When is this needed by?". Their answer was always "yesterday" so I had to reset their expectations to get a reasonable answer. Once I knew that, I could starts a feasibility study to see if the task could be done with the available time, resources and limitations, before I made any commitment..
The second one was "How important is it, compared to the tasks you have already assigned me". If you don't establish that, you will never be able to fit them all into your schedule and you will never deliver any on time.
Now I am retired, and spend most of my time doing graphic arts and tinkering with electronics. My schedules are flexible, dependent mostly on delivery times of ordered components but I still ask those questions when my wife assigns me any new tasks.
Regards,
Keith
It's good to be retired. The price of freedom is eternal vigilance. Avoiding the underhanded tactics of the folks who assign the tasks is among the most valuable of lessons. The other one is to make sure the requirements are clear and that "done" has an excruciatingly precise definition.
 

DickCappels

Joined Aug 21, 2008
6,461
I was working with a very senior (as senior as you can get without being a vice president) who was developing a high volume product. The conversation lead to a discussion of product cost. He said he had padded the Bill of Materials and was ready to swap out the expensive parts for less expensive parts for when the expected high pressure comes from above to reduce costs. Among the smartest guys -he knows how to manage up. He was very successful and saved hundreds of millions of dollars (or billions) compared to going elsewhere for the design.
 

KeithWalker

Joined Jul 10, 2017
1,062
As a follow up on my process of being assigned projects, once the timeframe was established, I drew up an acceptance document which detailed sign-off criteria for everything that was negotiated. Once that was accepted, the project became real.
Keith
 
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