Generating frequencies with transistors

Thread Starter

tom10122

Joined May 16, 2014
6
How would I go about generating a frequency with a transistor?(Using a computer psu 12v rail) Can i Just use a small capacitance capacitor and when it charges up all the way have it discharge the transistor, using the small capacitor would mean it discharges fast enough to make a frequency?
 

Thread Starter

tom10122

Joined May 16, 2014
6
Why don't you spell out the objective. It will go a lot faster.:)
I want to be able to oscillate a coil with 12v about 3-4 amps (preferably) at a frequency (14 mhz if I did the math right), In order to wirelessly transmit electricity. I have Just about everything figured out except how to generate a frequency for the transmitting coil.
 

m4lyg0s

Joined Apr 17, 2014
11
just wao , you guys want him to use the timer as a control circuit (14MHz) and a power circuit for the 4A ??? using something like Opto-isolator/triacs ???? , idk if that will work , assuming it will work , you need that type of wave? (square wave)
 

AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
8,585
At that freq and current, it might be easier to drive the coil with a 14 MHz square wave and resonate the coil with a cap. Worked in color TVs since the 50's, although 4 A is a bit of a modification.

ak
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,399
I have Just about everything figured out except how to generate a frequency for the transmitting coil.
That's like saying you have everything for building a radio transmitter at 14MHz, except for the radio part. An RF amplifier at 14MHz and 4A is not a trivial part of your project.
 

Thread Starter

tom10122

Joined May 16, 2014
6
At that freq and current, it might be easier to drive the coil with a 14 MHz square wave and resonate the coil with a cap. Worked in color TVs since the 50's, although 4 A is a bit of a modification.

ak
Thats how I'm resonating the receiving coil, I'll give it a shot thanks. Just thought it would be easier to build a circuit to transmit.
 

THE_RB

Joined Feb 11, 2008
5,438
How far are you expecting to "transmit the electricity"? And why the need for 14 MHz?

Electric toothbrush chargers use two coils placed near each other and run at 50 Hz or 60 Hz. Transmits electricity just fine.
 
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