Full Body Home Scanner (FBHS)

Thread Starter

danadak

Joined Mar 10, 2018
4,057
Who is going to build a FBHS, to detect medical changes like skin cancers,
color/size/position changes of malignancies, ticks (big deal in this area), and
general exterior issues. To create a profile and a health care tool. Big data
for mankinds good (could be abused, like everything else). Extensive image
recognition capabilities.

Useful for pets as well, goldfish.....:)

Mouth scans as well.


Regards, Dana.
 

Yaakov

Joined Jan 27, 2019
1,612
One of my colleagues specialized in math and engineering for medical imaging. He had grants from GE with stupidly strict IP rules. The work he did was extremely sophisticated and complex. It seems unlikely that, given the investment of time and brain into the algorithms for analysis, anything like what you describe is likely soon.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
6,303
Even on Star Trek the capabilities of the tricorders were a bit limited. There have been at least two contests to develop such devices and although there were some winners none of them came close to what you have described. The device described in post #1 will most likely only work in the Kingdom of Utopia, and will undoubtedly utilize a fair amount of the element "Unobtainium", which is both quite rare and very expensive, because it is so difficult to obtain in a usable form.
 

AnalogKid

Joined Aug 1, 2013
8,487
A top quality MR image series would have seemed like black magic 50 years ago, even to Paul Lauterbur. Back when, X-ray machines used to fill a room and you had to wait 10-15 minutes to process the film before you could see if you had a good image. In 2007 after my operation, the X-ray tech was excited about her new toy, an exam table with the sensor built in. Lay there, click/buzz, 10 seconds, image on a screen. Now they are the size of a thermos bottle, hang on the dentist's wall, the sensor goes in your mouth, and images pop up almost instantly. With a little extra software the images could go straight to a pad, phone, or watch.

Certainly a new, ultra-performance scanning technique is waiting to be invented. But the only difference between a contemporary full body scanner and a Tri-Corder is packaging, and the run from the ENIAC to the smart phone has shown what we can do about that when we want to.

ak
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
6,303
In reality, an effective scanner that anybody could buy and have at home would be a social DISASTER because it would provide so many more things for those afflicted with a high level of ambient fear to fixate about. Already we are afflicted with the germophobes and the allergy-phobic individuals living in a state of panic, and thus making life a lot less pleasant for the rest of us who are less fearful. Even wild animals are less fearful than those folks, as the animals have instincts to lead them towards avoiding that which is a danger while letting the rest slide on by.
So the home scanner would really need a far greater level of knowledge and insight to be an actual benefit instead of one more fuel for fears.
 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
4,705
They already have a prototype. It's called a dog. No, not an acronym, it's an actual dog. And if dogs can sniff out an odor from a particular disease or cancer then we should be able to build a detector that can detect the same thing. While evidence is lacking, there is indication that dogs can smell changes in the human body. If the dog knows what those changes mean they can alert us to the potential danger(s).

 

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
4,705
A neighbor had a dog that was trained to detect when a child was about to go into seizure. Such service dogs are currently employed and accepted as being a fairly good detector of the human condition and alert us to potential dangers.
 

wayneh

Joined Sep 9, 2010
16,398
I've heard that many or most dogs can detect these things, but it's more rare that they can be trained to care and take action when they detect it. In other words, cats can probably detect it also but they don't care.

Decades ago my mother worked with kidney patients in a clinical research setting. She said she could assess patients as soon as she entered their room. It takes a while but you learn the subtle smells of various ailments.
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
6,303
I've heard that many or most dogs can detect these things, but it's more rare that they can be trained to care and take action when they detect it. In other words, cats can probably detect it also but they don't care.

Decades ago my mother worked with kidney patients in a clinical research setting. She said she could assess patients as soon as she entered their room. It takes a while but you learn the subtle smells of various ailments.
Both humans and dogs have a very good connection between nose and brain and a far more powerful computing system than any available as hardware. They also have the rather huge advantage of having adaptable software of a level the IT folks can only dream about. So just because humans and dogs can do something is no reason to assume that a computer will be able to do it anywhere nearly as well.
 
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