Electric field due to an atom

Thread Starter

logearav

Joined Aug 19, 2011
243
A photon nearing a nucleus and under its intense electric field splits up into a pair of particles -- an electron and a positron.
Revered Members,
What is the source of electric field? Is it the stationary positively charged nucleus or the electrons orbiting around the nucleus?
 

steveb

Joined Jul 3, 2008
2,436
A photon nearing a nucleus and under its intense electric field splits up into a pair of particles -- an electron and a positron.
Revered Members,
What is the source of electric field? Is it the stationary positively charged nucleus or the electrons orbiting around the nucleus?
The main source of electric field is the positively charged nucleus.

The electrons are farther away and have diffuse distribution. Near the nucleus, the orbiting electrons tend to cancel each other's field which provides a "shielding" effect. The nucleus has all protons concentrated in a very small volume. As you get near that nucleus, the electric field from the protons becomes large and is very much larger than the field due to the electrons.
 

Wendy

Joined Mar 24, 2008
21,906
The electrons and protons in an atom. When they are not balanced the atom is ionized, which leads to all sorts of interesting special effects, usually (but not always) a plasma.
 

BillO

Joined Nov 24, 2008
990
If you are approaching the nucleus, presumably you are well within the electron 'orbitals'. The fields due to the electrons will essentially cancel out, or be much reduced, within the region of the nucleus. Thus leaving only the very strong field of the protons at close range.
 

studiot

Joined Nov 9, 2007
4,998
The process is called pair 'production'

You should also study 'Bremsstrahlung'
which is (nearly) the reverse process.

go well
 
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