DC and AC Amps difference?

Thread Starter

bowlingo

Joined Jun 29, 2011
162
Hi all,

I have a 5A 12V DC load that is supplied via a 5A 12V transformer. Someone has told me I can switch this via a 230V 3A relay i.e I break the 230V live on the supply side of the transformer. Is this correct? I always thought AC current was the same as DC current?

Thanks
 

mcgyvr

Joined Oct 15, 2009
5,394
They are wrong.
Amps are amps and in fact DC is actually harder to break due to it not having a zero crossing point like AC does.
So a relay might be rated like this 6A at 120VDC or 28VDC
 
Last edited:

Paul Kerry

Joined Jan 9, 2012
36
Hi all,

I have a 5A 12V DC load that is supplied via a 5A 12V transformer. Someone has told me I can switch this via a 230V 3A relay i.e I break the 230V live on the supply side of the transformer. Is this correct? I always thought AC current was the same as DC current?

Thanks
Your load equates to 12V x 5A = 60 watts, so the current on the primary (230V) of your transformer will be 261 mA. What you have been told is correct, but if you have a reasonable amount of smoothing on your 12 V DC your load will not power off immediately.

Regards
Paul
 

Thread Starter

bowlingo

Joined Jun 29, 2011
162
Your load equates to 12V x 5A = 60 watts, so the current on the primary (230V) of your transformer will be 261 mA. What you have been told is correct, but if you have a reasonable amount of smoothing on your 12 V DC your load will not power off immediately.

Regards
Paul
Thanks Paul...starting to make sense now 60 / 230 = 0.261 (261mA) this is the correct ohms law calculation?

"but if you have a reasonable amount of smoothing on your 12 V DC your load will not power off immediately" Can you explain this please?
 

praondevou

Joined Jul 9, 2011
2,935
Thanks Paul...starting to make sense now 60 / 230 = 0.261 (261mA) this is the correct ohms law calculation?

"but if you have a reasonable amount of smoothing on your 12 V DC your load will not power off immediately" Can you explain this please?
Because the smoothing capaicitor will provide current through your load,i.e. it discharges through it. The time it takes to discharge the capacitor depends on the load resistance and capacitor size.
 

mcgyvr

Joined Oct 15, 2009
5,394
wow I totally missed the last sentence about using the relay on the 230V side of the transformer.. It will work there no problem but you cannot use the relay on the 12V side.
 
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