Curb Find of the Day - 15,000 W Generator!!

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by SLK001, Sep 8, 2019.

  1. Reloadron

    Distinguished Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    I'm thinking you got yourself a fine generator. :)

    Ron
     
  2. MisterBill2

    Distinguished Member

    Jan 23, 2018
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    It may be that the evaporated gas left a nice film that protected it from corrosion. And that is quite a carb, that seems like a serious engine. Good luck.
     
  3. MrSoftware

    Senior Member

    Oct 29, 2013
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    I believe it's a 1L twin cylinder. It's a sizable generator for a residential portable.

    If it still seems plugged up, shoot some carb cleaner through every hole followed by compressed air. Sometimes that gets the chunks out that don't dissolve. Remove the rubber bits first if possible, sometimes carb cleaner makes them swell.
     
  4. shortbus

    Expert

    Sep 30, 2009
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    Not so much on newer carbs. The advent of ethanol gas made them change the type of rubber. But if possible to remove the rubber parts it's a still good to do.
     
  5. Reloadron

    Distinguished Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    Long as it's apart,looking at your image, I would remove the float valve (needle valve) and thoroughly clean it. Pay attention to the valve seat and needle noting even the slightest signs of any pitting or corrosion. I would also remove the two jets using a screwdriver and also clean them making sure there is no crud residue.

    Again, I am seeing a fine find. :)

    Ron
     
  6. SLK001

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Nov 29, 2011
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    Yes, already did that. It cleaned up nicely. I also used carb cleaner to shoot thru all the holes/jets, followed by a shot of compressed air. I hope that all the crud was removed, because the carb is really buried on this engine. I had to take off the intake manifold to get it off.

    The engine is a 30 HP twin with a 992 (1 liter) displacement. @MrSoftware , I almost posted this at the end of your inverter/transformer post, but I figured that that would be hijacking your threadd!

    More will follow...
     
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  7. SLK001

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Nov 29, 2011
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    Today, I was going to change the oil (probably not enough hours on the filter to change). It only holds about 1.5 quarts of oil, so I put an appropriate container to catch the oil. Here's what came out:

    [​IMG]

    I didn't have the second container ready for use, because, hey, it only holds 1.5 quarts. After the first GALLON, I thought that I was going to need a "bigger boat", so I plugged the outlet up and fetched another pot. I estimate about 7 quarts came out of the engine (probably mostly gasoline). It had the viscosity more like gasoline than oil. This explains why I got so much "blow back" thru the carb inlet when cranking. I'm glad that it didn't start up on me - it would probably have killed me in the resulting explosion!

    Since I took out so much "non-oil", I figured that I should replace the filter. I'll pick on up tonight at wallyworld.

    Saga continues...
     
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  8. SamR

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 19, 2019
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    Oil is cheap, but a cheap filter is worse than no oil at all. 1 1/2 quarts on a dual cylinder 30HP engine sounds on the low side? Looking like you made out like a bandit! Just thinking... Maybe a synthetic oil since there is so little of it and going to be sitting idle most of the time? Not to mention being air-cooled...
     
  9. Reloadron

    Distinguished Member

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    My old GT 992 V Twin 13 KW used 1.7 quarts. :)

    My best guess is that drained oil is mostly gasoline.

    When all is said and done you will likely have yourself one sweet great running generator for a really good price of hauling it home and cleaning it up. Yeah, good thing it didn't go bang! You can likely bump it up from curb find of the day to curb find of the month or year.

    Ron
     
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  10. MrSoftware

    Senior Member

    Oct 29, 2013
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    That's the same exact thing that used to happen to our old riding mower, the tank would slowly over a week or two drain into the cylinder, leak past the rings and end up in the oil. The first time it happened I just assumed whoever mowed the yard last put it away with an empty tank, and I mowed the yard with a few quarts of gas in the oil. The next time I was like "hey, I KNOW I didn't leave it with an empty tank", and upon further inspection realized the motor was full of gas. No explosion, though I shudder at the thought of how much extra wear that put on the motor. Anyway, I added an in-line petcock, changed the oil and the mower ran fine for many more years and I just recently sold it still running great, it was more than 15 years old.
     
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  11. SLK001

    Thread Starter Senior Member

    Nov 29, 2011
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    The specs call for 1.5 quarts with filter change, 1.2 without - that said, I think that I'll go by the dipstick. It is also has a pressurized oil system. I plan on replacing the filter with a Fram equivalent.
     
  12. SamR

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 19, 2019
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    Can't knock Fram but I avoid those marked "Store Brand". Was always a firm believer in Quaker State yea long ago since it was made from Pennsylvania Crude which had a high paraffin content. Not sure that even Pennzoil today still uses penn crude but oil refining has come a long way since "back-in-the-days". The good ole Briggs N Stratton 5HP thumper held a full quart and had no filter.
     
  13. Wolframore

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 21, 2019
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    high oil level due to gasoline in it isn't much of a fire hazard, but it can create hydrostatic lock which can do serious damage to the engine if it fires up.

    This is how I ended up with a 7HP Electrolux snow blower 10 years ago, still works great.
     
  14. MrSoftware

    Senior Member

    Oct 29, 2013
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    Not to start a filter debate, but open that new fram and with a white paper towel on your finger, run it around the threads. I used to buy fram until I did this and it came back full of metal powder, as if they did not wash it after cutting the threads. From then on, only OEM filters for me. It's amazing how marketing can make us think something is good, even though no objective comparison or data is given. Generac filters are on amazon.
     
  15. Reloadron

    Distinguished Member

    Jan 15, 2015
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    When I replaced the last whole house unit I bought the full service plan so for 5 years whatever it needs it gets. A local authorized rep company comes out and does everything on a regular basis. With the old unit I did it all but I figure I paid about $500 for the five year plan so that's about $100 a year or about $8.00 a month. The service frequency is based on the run time hours. They take care of everything. Last time I called them they were here within a few hours and they guarantee 24 hours. I can call them day or night. Getting older I just no longer have the ambition to do what I did years ago. Heck, I no longer even mow the lawn.

    Ron
     
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  16. shortbus

    Expert

    Sep 30, 2009
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    Don't think any of the OEMs make their own filter. But may be wrong, AC Delco filters used to be made by Wix. But the OEM just gets the company that bids the lowest.
     
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  17. MrSoftware

    Senior Member

    Oct 29, 2013
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    I had Toyota's for almost 20 years and their OEM parts were excellent. The oil filter threads were clean, filter end sealed with plastic and an oil plug gasket in the box. In particular the anti flow back valves worked great, I always had oil pressure almost immediately after a cold start in the morning. The frams would drain back and I would get a few seconds of no oil pressure on cold starts. I could be mistaken, but I think Denso makes the Toyota consumables.

    I now drive a Chevy and I've been less impressed with the OEM parts from Chevy.
     
  18. MJPunalei

    New Member

    Jun 3, 2019
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    Looks like a lot of gas had run into the cylinders and leaked past the rings into the oil sump. It was a good idea to drain and replace the oil, saves damage to rod bearings and cam journals. Be careful about soaking the entire carburetor in carburetor cleaner(it can even damage viton parts), That cleaner can cause swelling and damage to needle valve tips and seats if they are made of some natural materials and not synthetic materials. It is usually best not to use starting fluid in any large amount on small engines as it strips all lubrication from the cylinder walls and can cause damage. It is better to use WD40 - it is volatile enough to act as a starting fluid and will provide some lubrication before it evaporates.
    Aloha from around Makawao town Maui, Hawaii.
     
  19. KeepItSimpleStupid

    AAC Fanatic!

    Mar 4, 2014
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    My Toyota afternarket oil filter (Beck-Arnley) . When I changed it, I didn't realize I needed an English wrench. hand tighten, so I didn;t need one to put it on. Others, you had to lubricate both sides of the gasket.

    I did have to spear an oil filter to get it off another car.

    Speaking of carbs. The last of the carburated ERA, I had a 1982 Celica. that carb had like 130 parts. An internal passage got plugged. Had to drill out rivets to get it apart. Luckily I was able to use my employer's machine shop. It was the third automotive carb i rebuilt.

    Rebuild was "ALMOST PERFECT", but I had to take the top off again and tighten the float activated fuel valve, It did start after the rebuild. it just leaked.

    Agree with the use of Sta-bil.

    Seafoam https://seafoamsales.com/ has it's uses too.

    My 2-cycle Stihl leaf blower now has a head temperature gauge. So far, so good.

    I'm a glutton for punishment anyway. I bought the air conditioning as a $525.00 box of parts new from the dealer. Instruction manual was separate. 14 hours of labor not including charging. I think I needed a 12 to 14 mm open end wrench to tighten the belt the next day.
    then every 8 years, like clockwork, two hoses would blow.

    It had a vacuum motor that could pull 1/2 the recirculate damper to outside air to reduce icing. Pretty cool.
     
  20. SamR

    Well-Known Member

    Mar 19, 2019
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    I've had to spear a couple and one even had to have the hex insert in the block removed to get the filter off of it after some oil change bozo put it on too tight. Bought a couple of rubber pipe strap cam wrenches which I also have to use on the boats large screw-on fuel/water separator/micron filter which is in a terrible place for maintenance access and can only get maybe a 1/10 turn at a time on it. They get a good grip on greasy/oily stubborn filters.
     
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