Clarity please? Built a timer controlled outlet out of old Microwave. Adding a fan now. Question on fan?

Thread Starter

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
5,865
The opto is functioning. If the circuit isn't doing what it's supposed to be doing then it must be something controlling the opto. No idea why anything there could go wrong. I'm working at an ESD safe station with my wrist band.

I'll put all things back together and try it out again. Will let y'all know what happens.

[update] Back together and still no functionality. Will set up the oscilloscope and check for a signal. When I tested the opto I applied a small current and it switched the triac on. Again, will update you on the results with the scope. But that's going to take a while. Workbench is in the process of being reorganized (cleaned up I guess is another term for it).
 
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MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,467
OK, if the fan comes on then the triac is working. Thus either the MOC3023 has failed or it is getting no drive on pins 1&2. You can check for drive voltage with your DMM.
 

MaxHeadRoom

Joined Jul 18, 2013
22,856
Had power failure. One of the two lines from the transformer on the pole in my back yard burned through completely. adding another "tub" as they call transformers.
Your going to have to stop testing those heavy duty DIY circuits. :rolleyes:
They call it a 'Can' or a 'Pole Pig' up here!
Max.
 

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MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,467
The fried wire in the picture looks like a low voltage wire, not the HV on the top of the transformer. Sort of the results of a massive overload. Of course a copper cable of that same size would not have failed. Not only is copper a much better conductor, it does not corrode like aluminum always does.
 

Thread Starter

Tonyr1084

Joined Sep 24, 2015
5,865
I've been living here since 06/2006. Never seen any issues with that pole before. Have always worried about a transformer burning out - shedding hot, flaming oil to the ground. My wife has her garden real close to there and I've built my pavilion (patio) in that corner of the yard. Would HATE to see that burn.

Was talking with the linesmen (lines-person). The tub was hot. Partly due to the sun and 97˚F (36.1˚C); partly due to heavy loads. That tub supplies at least 14 homes. The linesmen said they're putting in a requisition to have another tub installed north of me. Take six homes off the tub in my back yard.

Back when the grid was built engineers imagined homes drawing 60A service. But with all the modern electronics and everyone going to air conditioning, the line isn't robust enough to keep up without stress. Eventually that stress will manifest itself as it did. David, my son-in-law, lives three doors north and has commented that he sees his lights flicker fairly regularly. His home is on the same tub as mine. But I don't think the breakage was the reason for the flickering. If the 0000 wire (aluminum as it is) has 21 strands and one of those strands breaks, that leaves the 20 strands to handle 105% of the load. Like LED's in parallel, when one burns out the rest get more current. In short order they will fail. As strands begin to fail, the cascade should be fairly quick.

I suspect a neighbor who has an auto shop business in his back yard may be drawing a heavier load. That may be the reason why Dave has been seeing flickering. I'm only a few feet from the transformer whereas he's quite a bit further. Flickering might be more pronounced.

Back to my issue with the fan circuit: I'm going to be rearranging my work station. It will take a while before I settle on a permanent setup for devices. I have an amplifier I may just find another home for. Maybe under-mount it on my desk (under the desk). Would be out of the way but still easily accessible. That means getting out the table saw and some lumber. Will probably be back this evening when things are organized.

")
 

MisterBill2

Joined Jan 23, 2018
8,467
Things age, and hot weather speeds up chemical reactions. In chem class we learned that ten degrees C tends to double reaction rates. So things do age faster at 95F, and if there was any moisture at all that makes it worse. My neighborhood has had a transformer for each 6 or 8 houses since I moved in back in 73. Some have been replaced, and the present wires don't have the burned loose insulation hanging down like years ago.
And a few weeks ago I had a phone converstaion with a DTE (our power company) engineer about the power outages and why our large square area would lose power whenever a block had a fault. I suggested that the response time of the circuit protection devices was a bit off, even though the current settings were correct. She said that was a possibility. Two weeks later there was some wind and the next block lost power but we did not. Never saw it happen that way before. I wonder if my comment helped a bit. No telling.
14 homes on one transformer seems like a really inadequate setup, is your power company one of those that goes CHEAP on everything? Like that one in California that has the poles too far apart, and fails to trim trees along the right-of-way frequently enough? Evidently that was so obvious that they lost the lawsuit for fire damages. Cutting some corners is very obvious sometimes.
 
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