bonding of csst

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by wcrenterprises, Nov 17, 2013.

  1. wcrenterprises

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 13, 2011
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    Hello,
    I bought a new gas furnace and gas dryer several years ago. I didn't have natural gas to the house before this time, the heating company I bought the furnace from installed the main gas line (1") from the meter and used csst (corrugated stainless steel tubing) to the furnace and clothes dryer. Since this install csst has had some problems with lightning and it has been concluded that it needs to be grounded. None of my lines have been grounded and I'd like to do it. Question is; should I drive a ground rod into the ground next to the meter and run a #6 wire from the gas line going into the house directly to the ground rod (easiest way) or do I go inside and run a #6 wire from the main gas line to the ground terminal in the electric box which goes to a grounding rod outside also?
    Also Gastite (maker of the gas line) shows them grounding each individual gas csst line, if they all connect to the main gas line and it is grounded would this still need to be done? If it still should be done with each individual csst line where should the ground wire be run to, the electric box?
     
  2. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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  3. wcrenterprises

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 13, 2011
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    0
    Thanks mcgyvr, I saw that when I was trying to find an answer and agree it should be done to NEC requirements but I want to make darn sure this is done right because within the last 12 years lightning has struck 3 times within 1000' of my house, if I get it wrong and it blows a hole in the csst to find a ground it wouldn't be good. In my reading of the article it says to put the clamp/wire upstream of the 1st csst connector and run it to the electrical ground, it is a shorter distance from the electric box to the gas line than from the electric box to the grounding rod, it is my understanding that lightning will take the shortest/quickest route to a ground. If it goes to the gas line I would think the csst line stands a good chance of getting a hole blown in it. That is my thinking if I'm wrong please set me straight as I'm looking for help to get it done right.
    Thanks again
     
  4. jollyredgiant

    New Member

    Jun 17, 2016
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    Dear, wcrenterprises I responsed to your 2013 gas line worry to be struck by lightning due to bad or not proper bonding of the csst tubing I must say that in the NEC code look up for bonding against lightning and I am sure it will tell you the actual distance to be from your house wire grounding system. The ground rod.(s) For grounding against lightning as you bond all the cssts together, on your gas line system the ground rod must be at least I think 10 feet from the grounding system (the house grnd rod/rods) measure from the end of the nearest grnd rod. This is to keep the voltage gradients emanating from activated lightning ground rod(due to a lightning strike) you put in, from interfering onto the ground system (house ground rod(s). Please go talk to the electrical field representive in your community (The Inspection authorities.)
     
  5. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    User jollyredgiant joined in 2016?
    First post is in response to something 5 years ago?

    Weird.
     
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