Blown component on circuit board

Thread Starter

Sirbu1985

Joined Mar 7, 2022
4
Can anyone help me out figuring out what part this is? It look like the one of capacitors that’s already on however on the board it has d1 below where it belongs as you can see in the image attached. From research I’m think it’s a zener diode however I’ve never seen a ZD like this before.

Apart from replacing the component that is blown, how can I see what else could be faulty?

I’ve attached picture of the part blown and also the pit selfimage.jpgimage.jpgimage.jpg
 

sagor

Joined Mar 10, 2019
704
Agree, MOV. The MOV is there to blow the fuse when there is a larger than expected voltage spike. Usually it does the job, and saves the rest of the circuit. The odd time, there may be other damage, usually at the input circuits.
Check the little brown rectangle by the power input/MOV. It is likely a fuse, and it may be blown "open" as well.
MOVs are rated by capacity (joules) and voltage. The diameter of the blown MOV will give indication of joule capacity (roughly). Voltage should be well over line voltage, usually around 50% (my estimate, others may disagree or have other estimates)
 

Thread Starter

Sirbu1985

Joined Mar 7, 2022
4
Hello savor, I just got another question. In the picture of the circuit board, there’s a dark green component that looks to be maybe blown to? Do you know how I could maybe check if it is faulty? Thanks
 

AlbertHall

Joined Jun 4, 2014
12,071
What is the letter/number designation next to it on the board?
Can you read any writing on the component itself?
Can you get a good picture of the component?
 

sagor

Joined Mar 10, 2019
704
Hello savor, I just got another question. In the picture of the circuit board, there’s a dark green component that looks to be maybe blown to? Do you know how I could maybe check if it is faulty? Thanks
Dark green "thing" may be a current inrush suppressor. They generally have a certain resistance, and as current passes thru it, the resistance drops (due to heating effect). Often called Current Inrush Limiter or Thermistor. These can vary, but for smaller power supplies, they may start around 5 to 100 ohms, and drop to a very low value (less than 1 ohm) under use when current is flowing. If they fail, they usually have burn marks, or are "open" in resistance.
That said, not sure if that green thing is indeed a Thermistor. There should be some markings on it, if so, Google that part number.

It is more likely the brown fuse is blown.
 
Top