Antenna wattage

Thread Starter

Track99

Joined Jun 30, 2022
38
Hello my friends.
I have a transceiver system.
It transmits and receives.
Inside the datasheet, under antenna data, it shows that the Power is 50 Watts Input.

1) What is this 50 Watts input power mean? Does it mean that at peak performance the antenna can withstand 50 Watts input without damaging itself?
2) What will happen if I use a antenna that is rated for 5 Watts?
 

Papabravo

Joined Feb 24, 2006
19,595
Hello my friends.
I have a transceiver system.
It transmits and receives.
Inside the datasheet, under antenna data, it shows that the Power is 50 Watts Input.

1) What is this 50 Watts input power mean? Does it mean that at peak performance the antenna can withstand 50 Watts input without damaging itself?
2) What will happen if I use a antenna that is rated for 5 Watts?
Can you provide a link to the datasheet? I'm not sure I understand your description of what is in the datasheet. There is a quantity called ERP, which stands for Effective Radiated Power. Is there any possible connection?
 

ronsimpson

Joined Oct 7, 2019
2,534
On my antennas there is a "max power".
What is the transceiver? What is its power output?

On the receiving side these numbers do not matter. On transmitting it does matter.
 

vu2nan

Joined Sep 11, 2014
277
Antenna input power is the product of the square of the antenna current and the antenna resistance at the point where the current is measured.

Likewise, it is the ratio of the square of the antenna voltage to the antenna resistance at the point where the current is measured.

Consider an antenna with an impedance of 50 Ω at its feed point. Inputting 50 W will entail applying 50 V and driving 1A at its feed point.

An antenna with a maximum input power of 50 W means that it can safely withstand 50V, 1 A at its feed point without getting damaged.

Nandu.
 
Last edited:

crutschow

Joined Mar 14, 2008
31,126
So basically if you use an antenna beyond it's rated transmitter power rating, the dielectric isolating the connections may deteriorate or arc over.
 

Janis59

Joined Aug 21, 2017
1,537
N=V^2/R thus 50=V^2/50 or V^2=250 means V=12 V. Gueass the thjree times is it very much to antenna or not :)
N=i^2*R thus 50=i^2*50 0r i^2=1 what means i=1 Ampere. Guess again, is it very much or not for Your resonator cross section.

RE:""What will happen if I use a antenna that is rated for 5 Watts"" - It probably have sth made from very thin wire what may overheat. Sure 11 Volts will not cause any arcing. But smoke may flow out.
 

ronsimpson

Joined Oct 7, 2019
2,534
I have worked on antennas that we put 50,000 watts into. These antennas are out in the rain and snow. Life at the top of a tower is not like it is in your house. I had problems, when a lightning storm is close the elements would spark over. At 100mhz, with a charge cloud over head, and high humidity the electrons will jump much farther than you think.
 

Janis59

Joined Aug 21, 2017
1,537
50 000=V^2/50 thus V^2=2 50 00 00 or V=1100 Volts. Of course the least possibility and arcing begins.
50 000=i^2*50 thus i^2=1000 or i=33 Amperes. Impressively!
Had seen the tree leafs near the antenna park of transmitter radiating about 200 kW. The leafs was vibrating and releasing the saund so it was possible to hear from it what dictor speaks in the studio. Awful!
 
Top