Advice: Logic Analyzer Purchase for Embedded Systems

Thread Starter

Kittu20

Joined Oct 12, 2022
470
Hello Everyone.

I'm relatively new to the field and seeking advice from experienced professionals. I'm in the process of purchasing a logic analyzer and could really use your expertise. I'm based in India My spending limit is up to 10,000 RS and work with embedded systems, focusing on protocols like SPI, I2C, and UART.

Any recommendations or guidance on reliable logic analyzers available in India that cater well to these requirements would be immensely helpful.
 

R!f@@

Joined Apr 2, 2009
9,918
If you are in India, you are more likely to find a vendor.
As for guidance, you do not specify you sampling rate and frequency as such.
Good ones are expensive and higher sampling rates and more channels.

Be specific in your requirements.
 

Thread Starter

Kittu20

Joined Oct 12, 2022
470
If you are in India, you are more likely to find a vendor.
As for guidance, you do not specify you sampling rate and frequency as such.
Good ones are expensive and higher sampling rates and more channels.

Be specific in your requirements.
I'm about to start into working with the STM32F407 Discovery Board and would greatly appreciate any suggestions or advice you might have for this device.

I don't have any idea which logic analyzer would better under up to 10,000 RS
 

sagor

Joined Mar 10, 2019
910
Are you more concerned about protocols or multiple logic signals? Many digital scopes now have protocol decoders in them. A logic analyzer could be for looking at 3, 6 or 10 signals all at the same time. That is a different function than a protocol analyzer (protocol storage and decode of I2C, UART, etc)
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
13,277
I'm about to start into working with the STM32F407 Discovery Board and would greatly appreciate any suggestions or advice you might have for this device.

I don't have any idea which logic analyzer would better under up to 10,000 RS
You can get a $20 USB logic logic analyzer that can handle signals up to 24MHz.
The free software has plugins for just about any binary protocol.
https://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/threads/logic-probe-for-can-bus.192771/post-1844883

The next step-up is a lot more money as a standalone device or MSO option.
https://usd.saleae.com/products/saleae-logic-pro-16
 

WBahn

Joined Mar 31, 2012
30,062
If I did this right, 10,000 RS is about $120 US. You aren't going to get much in the way of a standalone device for that.

Your best bet is going to be one of the many USB-based logic analyzers. Which one depends on so many things you haven't stated, such as voltage levels you need to be able to work with, how many signals at the same time, the minimum sampling rate, whether you need to be able to set trigger conditions, whether you need to be able to sync it with an analog waveform.

Google something like "USB logic analyzer" and see what is available.
 

Thread Starter

Kittu20

Joined Oct 12, 2022
470
Hello everyone,

I came across this link: Logic analyzer
before making a decision, I'd greatly appreciate experiences you might have with this 8CH USB Logic Analyzer from Robocraze.

My specific requirements involve working with SPI, I2C, and UART protocols and ARM . If anyone has used this particular model or has recommendations on its compatibility, reliability, and suitability for these protocols, I'd be grateful for your advice.
 

MrChips

Joined Oct 2, 2009
30,810
In 50 years of my electronics career, I have managed to get by ok without ever having seen, touched, or used a logic analyzer.

There may be a genuine use for a protocol analyzer if one were trying to snoop data off a serial or parallel bus. My type of problems usually go much beyond that, for example, trying to capture address and data that happened long before some unexpected failure. That type of logic analyzer is way over my budget. In any case, embedded MCU systems preclude any access to address and data busses.

If there is one type of oscilloscope I would love to own it would be a 4-channel oscilloscope. In the meantime, I manage ok with my basic Tektronix TDS 220 2-channel 1MHz oscilloscope.

As for working with STM32F407 embedded system development, all you would need is a good debugging tool and a decent 2-channel oscilloscope (and the inherent logic analyzer that I already have).
 

nsaspook

Joined Aug 27, 2009
13,277
Hello everyone,

I came across this link: Logic analyzer
before making a decision, I'd greatly appreciate experiences you might have with this 8CH USB Logic Analyzer from Robocraze.

My specific requirements involve working with SPI, I2C, and UART protocols and ARM . If anyone has used this particular model or has recommendations on its compatibility, reliability, and suitability for these protocols, I'd be grateful for your advice.
They work just fine for those simple protocols and more using the pulseview software: https://learn.sparkfun.com/tutorials/using-the-usb-logic-analyzer-with-sigrok-pulseview/all
https://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/...hase-for-embedded-systems.197929/post-1873233

How useful a Logic Analyzer is depends on the user and the type of problems being investigated or systems being designed. Do you absolutely need one for most embedded system development? Likely not but it can make the development process better if you do because you can eliminate some classes of problematic issues with a glance. For $20 it's a steal of a deal.
https://forum.allaboutcircuits.com/...mixed-signal-oscilloscope.188997/post-1766442
1702918802054.png
 

Thread Starter

Kittu20

Joined Oct 12, 2022
470
They work just fine for those simple protocols and more using the pulseview software: https://l
@nsaspook

I've been following your work on the battery management system on the forum and I'm truly impressed by your expertise in this field.

I'm eager to learn more and possibly create a similar system for hobby purposes. I was wondering if you could provide some guidance on the components needed for such a system. Additionally, I have budget issues I'd like to know which components could be reused for this project. I have PIC18F45K80, two pair of RS485

Unfortunately, I'm unable to send private messages at the moment. Could you kindly advise on how I might discuss this further with you?
 

John P

Joined Oct 14, 2008
2,026
I recently bought one of those 8-channel 24MHz analyzers, and I'm finding it quite useful. If you're working with PIC or Arduino processors, the speed is no problem, though Pi Pico or ESP32 might be a different matter. It's really good at giving you a view of what's actually happening outside a microcontroller, as opposed to what we think should be happening! Here's a screen capture of an Arduino controlling (or failing to control) a PN8150 RFID chip:
Clipboard03.jpg
 

R!f@@

Joined Apr 2, 2009
9,918
I recently bought one of those 8-channel 24MHz analyzers, and I'm finding it quite useful. If you're working with PIC or Arduino processors, the speed is no problem, though Pi Pico or ESP32 might be a different matter. It's really good at giving you a view of what's actually happening outside a microcontroller, as opposed to what we think should be happening! Here's a screen capture of an Arduino controlling (or failing to control) a PN8150 RFID chip:
View attachment 310341
how much is this?
 
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