16*2 LCD pins

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Dritech, May 11, 2013.

  1. Dritech

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2011
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  2. t06afre

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    I think to be on safe side. It is better that you use google and find the exact datasheet for your device
     
  3. atferrari

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    If your datasheet mentions A & K, those are the terminals of the LED in charge of backlighting.

    Just to be sure: take one datasheet from a LCD with and another without backlight. Compare them.

    In several displays you will find the last two numbers NOT in physical sequence with the rest. Maybe added later to an existing design?
     
  4. ErnieM

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    Apr 24, 2011
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    Your google hit matches the LCD's I have on hand. Those follow that common pattern.

    I would guess 16 pins mean you have a backlight. You should be able to see it, there's a LED or two on one end.
     
  5. Dritech

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2011
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    Hi,
    Thanks for the replies. The second link was the correct one, with the first 2 pins being the supply pins. But I have another problem. The characters are not showing on the 2nd line. When I set the potentiometer to full contrast, the squares does not show on the second line either.
    What can cause this problem please? is the LCD damaged?
     
  6. t06afre

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    The second line starts at adress 0x40h even for 2x16 displays I think
     
  7. MrChips

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    Send at least 80 characters to the LCD and see what happens.
     
  8. hexreader

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    Apr 16, 2011
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    This is normal for an LCD display that has not been initialised. There is nothing wrong with your LCD.
     
  9. Dritech

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Sep 21, 2011
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    I am writing 0X80 for the first line and 0XC0 for the second line. This worked perfectly on a simulator.

    I tried that and only the first row is showing.
     
  10. MrChips

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    Forget the simulator. The real world is your testing ground.

    Sending 0x80 and 0xC0 to the instruction register is the correct method for direct character positioning.

    Try sending a continuous stream of characters at a slow rate (2 chars per second) and see what happens. Characters should wrap around after 80 characters.
     
  11. atferrari

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    Is RTFM an option?

    All I can remember showed the starting address.
     
    ErnieM likes this.
  12. ErnieM

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    As long as failure is still an option it is not necessary to RTFM.
     
  13. Brownout

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    What is RTFM?
     
  14. t06afre

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    Read The <snip a F word> Manual
     
  15. Brownout

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    Welll, I read the manual, but didn't find it. :)
     
    Last edited: May 12, 2013
  16. Brownout

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    My apologies to t06afre for my (now changed) response. I totally misunderstood his post.
     
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