Your favourite non-fiction book

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by vvkannan, Mar 2, 2012.

  1. vvkannan

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Aug 9, 2008
    138
    11
    Hi all,
    What are your favourite non-fiction books ?The books you consider must-read or the books that taught you the most ? Do share!
     
  2. nerdegutta

    Moderator

    Dec 15, 2009
    2,515
    785
    Das Kapital - Karl Marx
    The Emperor - Machiavelli
    Attila the Hun - don't remember the author
    Animal Farm - George Orwell
    1984 - George Orwell

    A few books by Joseph Carr

    All the books written by Sven Hazel

    Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus - John Gray

    The list goes on and on and on....
     
  3. Blofeld

    Active Member

    Feb 21, 2010
    82
    18
    Electronics:
    "The Art of Electronics" by Horowitz and Hill

    Physics:
    "The Feynman Lectures on Physics" (Vol. I - III)
    "The Road to Reality" by Penrose
     
  4. 1chance

    Member

    Nov 26, 2011
    42
    184
    Anything by Loren Eiseley, especially The Night Country is worth reading. For a good overview of his works, The Star Thrower is a must read. I think his insights are as relevent now as they were back in the 50's and 60's. If you are not familiar with him, he was a famous US naturalist and paleontologist.
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2012
  5. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
    5,142
    1,266
    [offtopic]I have read relatively recently the "Jonathan Livingston Seagull" and I must say it caused me much more confusion compared to if I had read it when I was much younger.

    I also read "The cup of gold" by John Steinbeck at the same time and I must say I enjoyed it. It portrayed very well the struggle for life that becomes a daily routine in the end, leaving no joy; just growing out of your dreams. Sad but true.

    I have read quite some literature, but I can't recall it, unless I read the titles again. Too bad.[/offtopic]
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2012
  6. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
    2,375
    998
    Didn't the OP say nonfiction?

    Microelectronic Circuits by Sedra and Smith. I used it for three classes and still refer to it often. It's in the worst shape of any book I own.

    Never figured out what that book was all about.
     
  7. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
    5,142
    1,266
    You 're right, he said non fiction, I slipped.

    Digital Logic Design by Morris and Mano is the one I have used the most and I also like Modern Control Systems by Bishop and Dorf.
    Sedra/Smith is a good read too.
     
  8. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
    12,420
    3,355
  9. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
    5,142
    1,266
    But isn't it a bit superficial to say that only non-fiction books teach worthy things? That discredits many literature masterpieces.

    If that seems as an off-topic branch-off to the OP, I 'll delete my comment.
     
  10. steveb

    Senior Member

    Jul 3, 2008
    2,433
    469
    I don't think he said, or even implied, that. Perhaps he just wants some ideas on what he should read and prefers to look at non-fiction right now.

    The thing I find difficult about this thread is that non-fiction itself is so broad.

    I'll mention Walden, by Thoreau and The Principles of Quantum Mechanics by Dirac.
     
    Brownout likes this.
  11. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
    2,375
    998
    My favorite nonfiction books are those which help me to persue my vocation or hobbies with greater knowledge. I almost forgot: Comos by Carl Sagan
     
    Zazoo likes this.
  12. Blofeld

    Active Member

    Feb 21, 2010
    82
    18
    "The Soul of a New Machine" by Kidder once had a big influence on me, but I hesitate to recommend it today.

    When I read the German translation of it in the mid 80s, the computers that are described in the book were already outdated, but not as completely and hopelessly outdated as today. I'm afraid people might just chuckle about them. And then it is hard to get this feeling that building such computers is a really cool adventure that I had when reading the book. I don't know if there is a comparable book about some modern devices by Intel or Apple or whatever.
     
  13. Markd77

    Senior Member

    Sep 7, 2009
    2,803
    594
    Anything by Forrest M Mims III, and "The Left Hand of the Electron", "The Universe" and "The Relativity of Wrong" by Asimov. I keep meaning to get more Asimov non-fiction, it's very well written.
     
  14. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
    5,939
    1,222
    The art of war by Sun Tzu
     
  15. Georacer

    Moderator

    Nov 25, 2009
    5,142
    1,266
    I read that about a year ago, but I 'm afraid it was a summary/translation of about 100 pages. Is the original longer?

    In general I didn't find it very useful. Rather trivial facts given in it which have very general application.

    Much like "Dialectics of Nature" by Engels. I could finish it, because of the un-scientific way it was written, by today's standards. It served me more as a history book, rather than a source of new knowledge.
     
  16. vvkannan

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Aug 9, 2008
    138
    11
    I didnt mean that.As steveb said I was looking for suggestions on non-fiction by which I mean popular science,biographies,history etc
     
  17. justtrying

    Active Member

    Mar 9, 2011
    329
    341
    well 1984 is not fiction anymore.... I've recently read "Watership Down" quite good as well. "Island of the Color Blind" is a good book about lytico-bodig (similar to ALS). Anything by Kurt Vonneghut (non-fiction really as based on his experience). My favorite is Julio Cortazar. A lot of fiction books, when well written give us a great view into life of the period. "Last Day of a Condemned Man" by Victor Hugo... I can keep going...

    The thing is, I have read a lot of fiction and non-fiction. Books that have taught me the most are fiction based on real-life experiences of their author or family history. The only one that is recent is "Three day road" that comes close to what was written in 1950s and prior. It teaches about people. Non-fiction books are just reference.

    "Only in dreams, in poetry, in play do we sometimes arrive at what we were before we were this thing that, who knows, we are."
     
    Zazoo likes this.
  18. lightingman

    Senior Member

    Apr 19, 2007
    374
    22
    My National Semiconductor 4000 series data book. LOL
     
  19. mbohuntr

    Active Member

    Apr 6, 2009
    413
    32
    The Forgotten Soldier (Guy Sajer) Not sure how it's classified, as it is an autobiography, and referenced as both. Great read on the plight of the ordinary german soldier in WWII. Kind of an eye opener.
     
  20. Zazoo

    Member

    Jul 27, 2011
    114
    43
    Being and Nothingness - Sartre

    The Day the Universe Changed - James Burke (The BBC companion series is also great)

    Endurance - Alfred Lansing
     
Loading...