Your Career Goals and How Things Turned Out!

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by jegues, May 23, 2011.

  1. jegues

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Sep 13, 2010
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    I'm just curious as to what some of the members on this forums ambitions/goals are/were when they embarked on their careers, and how things evolved other the years.(Career wise)

    Did you end up doing what you've dreamt of doing? Could you even decide what you wanted to do? Did something find you?

    For example, maybe one had hopes of being a professor and ended up being an engineer or technologist, and is enjoying themself much more than they expected.

    Sometimes you know what you're looking for in life, and other times something finds you!

    Share your experiences!

    As for me, I'm just an engineering student for now!;)
     
    Last edited: May 23, 2011
  2. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    It's going pretty much to plan.

    Life sucks.
    Then you die.
    Then they throw dirt in your face.
    Then the worms eat you.
    Pray it happens in that order.
     
  3. jegues

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Sep 13, 2010
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    Bill! Surely there's more to it than that!

    :rolleyes:
     
  4. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    OH! Did I leave out

    Then you get married,
    The she takes you to the bank.
     
  5. steveb

    Senior Member

    Jul 3, 2008
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    It's funny that Bill mentions the "order" of things. My goals after my engineering degree were to first get an engineering job doing product development and research, then start, build and sell a technology based company and then teach till I die. Turns out that I taught a little right out of school, then started, built and sold a technology based company (with a co-founder) and now I do engineering research. Hopefully, I won't die too soon. If I don't, perhaps the plan will repeat another full cycle.


    Enjoy this time. For me it was a magical time, like no other. You can never go back to that part of your life again. No repeats there!
     
  6. jegues

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Sep 13, 2010
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    Where did you teach? Did you do a Masters/PhD beforehand?

    What technology was your company based around, and in what field are you now doing research?

    Thanks for sharing!
     
  7. steveb

    Senior Member

    Jul 3, 2008
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    Taught at my University after getting a PhD. -Not as a prof. but just as a fill-in instructor for a year, while they replaced another prof. that suddenly retired earlier than expected. I never had ambition to be a prof with both teaching and research duties, but the idea of just teaching during retirement years always seemed interesting to me. But, a plan is a plan and an opportunity is something else entirely. A good life lesson is to grab those opportunities when they pop up, because they may not be available at your "planned" time

    My company was based on fiber-optic technology in the telecommunications industry. Once again random opportunity showed up and my PhD research had market potential. Didn't plan for a company so fast, but opportunities are better than plans. Sold out in 2000, right before the bottom fell out of that market. Then I watched the entire industry implode faster than a trans-Atlantic light pulse. This was quite depressing to see, so I switched fields and now do research in motor/generator technology and renewable energy technology. Fun stuff !!!
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2011
  8. happyganl

    Active Member

    Dec 17, 2009
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    I am the same major as you.when choose what I will learn, I feel this name sound high-tech:p. But I didnt want to be any expects or teachers.

    after graduate,I do some work involve electronicas,4 years later,change another position,as many ones knows:)

    now I dont any ambition on work,Thanks to I am not a man:D
     
  9. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    I have to admit I liked college.

    I'm not a engineer, but my 1st job was excellent and interesting.

    I worked my way up to a lead tech, stayed there 24 years. Unfortunatly I lost it due to the IT collapse of 2001. We made fiber optic high speed digital transmitters and recievers at Alcatel. All I have to say about my life now is at least I have a job (but not much else).

    A job you love is a thing of joy. I definately miss it.
     
  10. rogs

    Active Member

    Aug 28, 2009
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    I started out as field service tech, repairing electronic organs and synthesisers in the 1970's, and got into doing some design, related to custom mods for that kind of equipment.
    I had the chance to design an audio processor for decoding optical analogue stereo sound tracks in film sound, and then went on to design and build specialised emergency audio equipment, for a small company in the fire alarm industry.

    Never did get round to finishing my formal engineering graduate qualifications, and just used my tech qualifications and experience.

    Retired now -- and am glad I don't have work on projects that are now,IMHO, dominated by unecessary 'paperwork'.

    For example, since April this year, all audio equipment- even custom stuff - that is supplied in the EU, to the fire alarm industry, has to meet European Standard regs EN 54 pt. 16.

    Costs between £50K and £100K ($100K) PER PRODUCT to get it through the tests!

    Glad to be out now. Electronics doesn't seem to quite so much fun any more......
     
  11. mbohuntr

    Active Member

    Apr 6, 2009
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    I wanted to be a welder since I was 13. Got my first certification when I was 16, Finished school/trade school when I was 17. Like these guys I continued learning. I went into fabrication/ layout and took some machining classes.
    I really enjoy(ed) the field, doing custom fabrication. Like Pawn Stars says; "You never know what will walk in thru the front door." Everything from turbine parts and prototypes to rocker panels for a elderly gentlemans truck.

    NAFTA changed the playing field, and along with a back injury, I realized I couldn't continue busting my hump for less and less money, no benefits, and the liklihood I would become disabled long before I retired. Decided to accept a job in a utility company when they were hiring like crazy. Since I was kicking around waiting for a maintanence job to open up, decided to get a degree. (something I've always wanted) Decided to try electrical/electronics since many companies are looking for people with broad skill sets. I figured if I could repair/rebuild most things that wear out, I might be very employable.

    Right now Engineers are the flavor of the year as companies are looking for ways to improve inefficient operations, do more work with less people, and anticipate future demand. The only advice I could give is not to go into a field that will die off in 5 years, (Internet boom, game programming etc.) My nephew is rapidly moving up in Verizon, but finding the technology advancing so fast that he is always forced to go back to the classroom or risk being let go. The stress level is very high. Try to find something you enjoy because you will do it better, and something that will provide some stability in an economy where there is little of that.

    Also... don't forget to enjoy the journey... it's a one way trip.
     
  12. magnet18

    Senior Member

    Dec 22, 2010
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    Bill, cheer up!
    If you have a job, you don't need to enjoy it, that's what hobbies are for! Keep looking for new jobs and you'll probably find one eventually.
    I've found that when things pretty much suck you can turn them around with the right mindset (speaking of things sucking, I need to go do 3 labs... don't expect to hear from me again tonight :p).

    My career goals are to go to college for EE or physics and get a job that's at least a bit better than shoveling bird crap and pulling weeds.
    And then invent something, become rich, and retire at 40. Standard plan there.

    If I can't do that then I will just make do with whatever I get and settle for becoming internet famous for doing cool stuffs.

    If all else fails I'll move to a remote island or arizona or something and open an electronics repair/restoration shop.
     
    Last edited: May 24, 2011
  13. happyganl

    Active Member

    Dec 17, 2009
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    plans well:cool:
     
  14. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
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    Started my Electrical education in '65, when I was done with school(69) went to work in construction, maintenance. In '80 I switched to Electronics while working for Carrier Air Conditioning. Had it made there, did component level circuit board repair, worked on 1 kw lasers, did all the systems in the building(fire alarm,cctv,bar code time clocks,computer networking,RF data collection system,etc..)
    Then the plant closed in'05, NAFTA came and 1,800 people were out of a job. The school where I now teach (and graduated from in '81) called and said their Instructor was retiring. I asked what that had to do with me, they offered me the job. It's the last thing in the world I ever thought I'd be doing, but it's a good fit.
    I get to keep up with what's new, and best of all, I get to pass on what little i know. And trust me, when you teach, students will ask questions you never thought of. That in turn forces me to find out how or why something does what it does, and that is really interesting to me. I teach Electronics and Industrial/Residential Electricity. Two weeks ago I was on the committee that sets the Electronics Curriculum for the state, I sat there thinking "Wow, how did I end up here"
    The NEC (National Electrical Code) changes every 3 years, and I have to keep current, or my students won't pass their state Electricians License test. And that is a bad reflection on me and the school. I place about 90% of my graduates, they cover the spectrum from construction, petroleum industry, maintenance, manufacturing, electronic security, service techs, and a few started their own businesses.
    I am a lucky man...
     
  15. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
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    out of high school I apprenticed for a Millwright. Wanting a change I got into management but the technical bug bit me so I got into electrical. Wanting a change I got my Realtors license, but the technical bug bit me so I got into electronics. Wanting a change I started my own construction business, but the technical bug bit me and I got into Instrumentation. Will I ever be free?
     
  16. nsaspook

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
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    Several times, ouch. By the third time you learn to hide the money.:)
     
    Last edited: May 25, 2011
  17. loosewire

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 25, 2008
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    This business world has been transformed into a C.E.O. model.
    All the money at the top,every one talks about it but does nothing.
    There are no good jobs because the money stay at the top.
    Stock holders that don't work control the money and system.
    Last week a guy tried to buy three major companies with false paper work.
     
  18. jegues

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Sep 13, 2010
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    Seems like you got a little touch of everything!

    Teaching is something I could see myself doing in the future, I'll always enjoyed helping others with mathematics/electronics!;)
     
  19. nsaspook

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 27, 2009
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    My primary career goal now is to stay healthy so I can enjoy my retirement in less than 10 years. I decided not to take a high stress position at work for more money because really at this point in life my personal time is a lot more valuable. I'm 50+ with a 5 yo girl that I want to see finish college.
     
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