Would this be a correct way of calculating total resistance?

Discussion in 'Homework Help' started by barrett50, Feb 6, 2016.

  1. barrett50

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 1, 2016
    14
    0
    So I have here that

    R1 = 470 ohm
    R2 = 660 ohm
    R3 = 290 ohm
    Ry = 500 ohm

    Would I be correct in saying that I can join these into 1 Resistor by the follow?

    Rs1 = 1/((1/470) + (1/660)) = 274.51 ohm

    Rs2 = 1/((1/290) + (1/500)) = 183.54 ohm

    then because Rs1 and Rs2 are in a series, I can now do

    Rs1 + Rs2 = Rtot
    => Rtot = 274.51 + 183.54 = 458.05 ohm
     
  2. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
    17,757
    4,800
    Yes, that looks correct except for the sloppiness with your units. It should be, for example

    Rs1 = 1/((1/470 Ω) + (1/660 Ω)) = 274.51 Ω
    Rs2 = 1/((1/290 Ω) + (1/500 Ω)) = 183.54 Ω

    Rs1 + Rs2 = Rtot
    => Rtot = 274.51 Ω + 183.54 Ω = 458.05 Ω
     
  3. barrett50

    Thread Starter New Member

    Feb 1, 2016
    14
    0
    Thanks for that. I'll be a little more organized next time I post
     
  4. shteii01

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 19, 2010
    3,393
    497
    When dealing with resistors in parallel, normal people use the formula in this form:
    <br />
R_{Total}=\frac{R_1*R_2}{R_1+R_2}<br />

    It is the same formula like you have, but it is in the form that is easier and more convenient to write and solve.
     
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