Would a diode block audio?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by CaptainPrice, May 16, 2011.

  1. CaptainPrice

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Aug 12, 2009
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    I was just curios what would happen if you put a diode on a sound input? Would the sound be able go through the diode since its kinda like a wave?
     
  2. Adjuster

    Well-Known Member

    Dec 26, 2010
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    300
    Nothing particularly nice, I would say. What would happen would depend on the signal level and whether there was a path for DC current. It would also depend on what you meant by "on a sound input" - in series or in parallel with it?

    In series with an audio signal, a (typical silicon) diode would pretty much block any signal of less than 0.6V peak. Above that level you might get the higher peaks of one polarity coming through (which would sound horrible), but only if the signal source and load permitted a net flow of DC current. If there were DC blocking capacitors on either side of the diode, they would tend to charge to the highest peak, after which no more would get through. The DC voltage change might possibly be damaging.

    If the diode were in parallel with the signal, it would come through unaffected up to 0.6V peak amplitude, above which there could be a loss of higher peaks of one polarity (again, nasty distortion), if there was a DC path. There may be a bigger chance of causing damage in this situation - for instance, do not even think of connecting a diode in parallel with the feed to a loudspeaker.
     
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  3. CaptainPrice

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Aug 12, 2009
    49
    0
    thanks [Adjuster] just what I was looking for!
     
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