Wiring COB led's in series

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by bobelon, Jun 26, 2016.

  1. bobelon

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 24, 2016
    4
    0
    I have ten (10) 12 volt 10 watt cob led's and a 12V X 5A power supply. I wired two rows of 5 led's in series and hooked them up to the ps. Nothing happened. All ten will light up if I wire each one individually to the ps. Can someone explain why I can't wire them in series? Also, can a dimmer be incorporated in this circuit?
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2016
  2. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
    3,211
    619
    Welcome to AAC!

    Per your description, they require 12V. They need to be wired in parallel.
     
  3. bobelon

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 24, 2016
    4
    0
    Yes but they each draw less than one amp and the power supply can supply 5 amps - for 5 one amp led's.
     
  4. joeyd999

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 6, 2011
    2,673
    2,712
    Yes but it doesn't matter what you desire. You can't get past the physics.
     
  5. bobelon

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 24, 2016
    4
    0
    Never studied physics, just trying to use my old brain. I guess what you're telling me is that five 12v led's in series need 60v - ok, cool, I just hooked them up to my ps and they all lit - in fact, all ten lit. Now please explain how a 5 amp ps can power ten 1 amp led's? Also, Can I dim these led's???
     
  6. myntath

    New Member

    Jun 26, 2016
    3
    1
    Yes but the voltage is split between components in series and so for the two LEDs in series they only receive 6v each and so they do not function.

    You would need all the LEDs in parallel as mentioned by others, but it sounds like that will draw too much power from your supply. (Total power = 10LEDs * 10W = 100Watts, Using P=VI, 100W/12V = 8.33A, which is greater than 5A) So you will need a bigger power supply or cut it down to 6 LEDs.
     
  7. myntath

    New Member

    Jun 26, 2016
    3
    1
    The power supply will try to supply as many amps as you ask from it. But you are working it too hard. It will probably get hot and burn out fairly quickly running at a higher current than it is designed for.
     
  8. bobelon

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jun 24, 2016
    4
    0
    I had not considered that I could be overworking the PS. Thanks. Lots of learning here. Still interested in dimming the circuit.
     
Loading...