Wiring 6 wire 3-spd exhaust blower to 120V AC

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Mikeysp, May 18, 2016.

  1. Mikeysp

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 11, 2016
    12
    0
    The fan is off a over range microwave. See picture below.

    The yellow label on the motor caused me some confusion.

    1. I am trying to wire the fan to run high speed and plug into a standard 120V/60Hz AC Outlet with a simple on/off switch. The fan will not be going back into a microwave so I will be cutting off the plug connector. Can I wire it directly to a 120V AC plug, or do I need some special power supply between the 120V outlet and the fan? If you look at the label on the motor, it has "input: 210/125/100". What does this mean? Input in my mind is 120V AC, so I am a bit confused.

    2. I have added a pic of a capacitor that I have on hand. The mF do not match. Will my capacitor work fine, or do I need to get another capacitor?

    3. What is the rectangle with the letters T/P on the diagram?

    5. How I was thinking it should be wired, before the yellow data label confused me:

    Neutral to white wire.
    Hot through a toggle switch to the blue wire for high speed operation.
    Orange and Red to the capacitor.
    Violet and Yellow not used.

    Thank you,

    -Mike

    Info Plate.jpg fan plug.jpg 20160511_182841.jpg
     
  2. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,511
    2,369
    Looks correct, T/P temperature sensor, Thermally Protected.?.
    Cap should not be super critical.
    Max.
     
  3. JWHassler

    Member

    Sep 25, 2013
    201
    33
    Your idea seems correct, since the wires are marked H,M, and L
     
  4. Mikeysp

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 11, 2016
    12
    0
    Thanks for your response Max.

    I will just eliminate the temperature sensor, unless, of course, it is an internal item on the motor.
     
  5. Mikeysp

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 11, 2016
    12
    0
    Does anyone know what that 210/125/100 on the yellow label refers to?
     
  6. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,511
    2,369
    The thermal sensor is usually embedded in the winding's.
    I am assuming that the impedance is such that it will tolerate a wide voltage range.
    Max.
     
  7. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,257
    6,763
    Looks like watts from here.
     
  8. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,511
    2,369
    Probably more accurate a reason.
    Max.
     
    #12 likes this.
  9. Mikeysp

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 11, 2016
    12
    0
    Of course. Thank you men! Have a good evening!
     
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