Wires recommended for soldering smt pic 12f

Discussion in 'Embedded Systems and Microcontrollers' started by amitr12345, Jun 21, 2013.

  1. amitr12345

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 17, 2013
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    2
    Hi everyone,

    I am using a very low diameter wires to solder a pic 12f629.

    I think it may cause theprogramming failure i am experiencing due to high resistance (maybe)

    What do u pro's recommend for soldering on a bread board (diameter, brand)?

    I am using a sop to dip 8 pin convertor and then soldering on the bread board, from the breadboard i put dip pins which connects directly to a pickit 3.

    Meaning pickit is connected directly to the bread board without further wires.

    Thaught that maybe lowering resistance of cable by getting a wider diameter will solve the issue..
     
  2. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    I often use #30AWG wire for PICs, a small diameter wire. As there are only very low currents involved such wire is just fine.

    (For power linesI'll use #26 solid bus wire

    I would never wire my PICkit into the circuit. I use connector pins (called berg strips and other things) like so:
    [​IMG]
    Snap off 6 pins and wire into circuit, just plug in the PICkit when it is time to program. If I'm going to be doing debug on the unit I'll get right angle connector pins so the set-up lays flat.

    Miswiring the PICkit is one of the things I seem to always mess up. Check, re-check, and re-re-check these connections. My miswire is to swap data and clock.
     
  3. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    Why are you using SMD PIC? Just because that's what you have, or is there another reason? I am just curious.

    BTW, here's the way I breadboard with a 12F629.

    And I'm not a pro...just a tinkerer.
     
    Last edited: Jun 21, 2013
    absf likes this.
  4. amitr12345

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 17, 2013
    37
    2
    Just because i have it.. Waiting for other dip pics.

    With what wires did u connect the dip pins to the mcu ?
     
  5. amitr12345

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 17, 2013
    37
    2
    And ernie, thnx for the recommendation
     
  6. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    If I am using the solderless breadboard, I use 22AWG wires for all connections. If I am soldering point to point, I use 26AWG most of the time, but I have used 30AWG, as shown in the photo below.
     
  7. amitr12345

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 17, 2013
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    nice work.. what i see in your picture tracecom, is it 22 or 26 awg ?
     
  8. tracecom

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 16, 2010
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    That is 30AWG. Thanks for the compliment.
     
  9. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
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    It's best to buy some small "SOIC SMD adapter PCBs" like this;

    [​IMG]

    You can buy a card with lots of little PCBs of different SMD IC sizes, and snap them off the card when needed.
     
    ErnieM likes this.
  10. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    100% agree. I have a small stock of various sizes in my parts box.

    I get them off EBay from China for cheap, maybe a quarter for a SOIC-8, maybe a dollar for a 100 pin QFN. The better ones have different patterns on each side. They take about 2 weeks with free shipping, so I like to keep them in advance of need.

    With many of the newer parts only coming in SMD packages it's an important tool to have available.
     
  11. amitr12345

    Thread Starter Member

    Jun 17, 2013
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    does anyone know the difference between 30 AWG's ??

    there is kynar insulated wire, is it best for soldering to the PCB ?
     
  12. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    I use kynar. I believe it was originally produced for wire wrap (a whole other topic and now near obsolete) but it is still made. It works well, though the insulation will melt during soldering. Just try not to handle it near the end when soldering.

    It comes in many colors which is always a help in wiring anything

    Kynar is made from Polyvinylidene fluoride, or polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) is a highly non-reactive and pure thermoplastic fluoropolymer produced by the polymerization of vinylidene difluoride, and if you actually read all of that you've concluded none of it is of any use to you. I just coppied it from Wikipedia for fun.

    [​IMG]
     
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