Will this work?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by dustiin, Feb 8, 2010.

  1. dustiin

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 13, 2010
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    I'm wiring up some blinkers. I have the blinkers all wired up to the switch where they work. But they don't blink, because I now need a flasher. (Thought the blinkers would blink themselves) Ha.

    The bike is a 2002 wr250f. Puts out AC current (no rectifier) at 11.5~13.3 The turn signals are LED 1.4w 12volt draw. The LEDs light up quite nicely to, just need it to blink!

    Will this flasher work?

    [​IMG]

    Should be simple to yah =D

    Thanks.
     
  2. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    In your circuit, the line that is hot when the blinkers should be blinking, will be connected to the 'B' tab.
    The 'E' Will run to ground.
    The Leds POSITIVE or ANODE will connect to the 'L' tab. You an then run the NEGATIVE or CATHODE of the LED unit to GROUND.

    The power will enter the "flasher" relay at 'B' and send a pulsed signal (about 90 times a min) out tab 'L'.

    [ed]
    I just realized that the flasher is rated at 12VDC. You may need a diode rectifier before the flasher. Did you say the leds lit up on 12v AC?
    Does the bike have a battery?
    [/ed]
     
    Last edited: Feb 8, 2010
  3. dustiin

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 13, 2010
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    Bike doesn't have a battery. Decided not to add one. Got plenty of rectifiers.

    Yes, the LEDs lit just as bright on AC as they did on my 12volt battery.

    The way I have this wired up is the switch has 3 wires. 1 wire is for the power, left and then right. The LED's - wires are connected to the bike's ground already.

    The hot wire should be connected to B and then the bike's ground connected to E and the L will then connect to the wire going to the switch. Right'o

    Sounds easy enough, just wanted to be sure this would work. I'll try to make it work first without a rectifier. It also seems like with that setup the relay would be making the clicking all of the time since the + and - are directly connected to it. Right? Wrong?
     
  4. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    Right. You will need two relays. If you use one, it will click all the time and the switch will guide where you want the signal to go. If you had 2, the switch would go to 'B' for the left one and 'B' on the other relay for the right one. That is the only way for the lights to know which one you want to blink.
     
  5. dustiin

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 13, 2010
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    Sorry if I'm being ignorant. Here's my diagram I used paint to make.

    Is this right. tried to make it readable.

    [​IMG]
     
  6. dustiin

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 13, 2010
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    Red wire on the LED = positive. Should have made bike's hot wire red too.
     
  7. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    That is correct.
     
  8. whatsthatsmell

    Active Member

    Oct 9, 2009
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    I would try just wiring one flasher before the switch. The flasher shouldn't "blink" with no current running through it, hence the .02A - 20A rating.

    You will know when you wire the B to positive and E to negative with nothing attached to L. If it starts flashing then you will have to use two, but if it doesn't, wire the L to the input of the bike's blinker switch and you should be all set.

    It's worth a try to save the cost of another flasher. ;)
     
  9. AllVol

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 22, 2005
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    Wonder what would happen if the bike hot was supplied direct to the led, with ground going to the relay? That way the relay would switch the led on and off directly at the control of the directional switch.
     
  10. dustiin

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 13, 2010
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    Well seems like it should blink with the hot and ground wire going straight to it, or does it need some load on the L pin to even think about blinking.
     
  11. whatsthatsmell

    Active Member

    Oct 9, 2009
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    Traditional Flashers needed a load to heat the metal contact arm in the flasher to make and break the contact. That is why they wouldn't work when one bulb was blown nor will they work with LEDs - there simply is not enough current flowing to create enough heat to break the contact.

    With the current rating of the flasher that you pictured, I think that it requires current flow also. I doubt if it is simply a "timer in a box".
     
  12. dustiin

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 13, 2010
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    Ohhh...so it does need the power to go to the LED to heat a contact to break a switch. So I do in fact just need 1 flasher? Yay. I believe I got this figured out now.
     
  13. dustiin

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 13, 2010
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    So this is how it's supposed to look?

    [​IMG]
     
  14. whatsthatsmell

    Active Member

    Oct 9, 2009
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    Looks Good.
     
  15. dustiin

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 13, 2010
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    Yay. Thanks all!
     
  16. retched

    AAC Fanatic!

    Dec 5, 2009
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    This is why forums are great. Especially this one. I didn't even consider the second option.
     
  17. dustiin

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 13, 2010
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    To bring this up again. I have wired it with a battery, (and with my bike's AC rectified to DC) and all the blinkers just stay lit. They don't blink.

    I read a little and lots of people said use resistors. I picked up a handful of different resistors, ranging from 4.4ohms to 340ohms. None of the resistors work, they stayed solid, or dimmed. I tried adding a little .21amp PC fan onto the circuit to see if it would trigger the flasher, that didn't work either.

    Any ideas? This is the second flasher I've tried by the way too. I don't think it's defective cause taking it apart it looks well. Sigh.
     
  18. dustiin

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 13, 2010
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    Also with these resistors, I just connected one end to the L pin and the other end to the Positive wire going to the LEDs
     
  19. dustiin

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 13, 2010
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    Thinking about buying this 2 pin thermal flasher. If the blinkers blink too fast I'll add resistors...if they blink at all. Would a regular 2 pin thermal flasher relay work? It's 12v.
     
  20. dustiin

    Thread Starter Member

    Jan 13, 2010
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    Ah ha. I hooked the power to the LEDs to my 12volt battery. I then hooked a small DC motor into the load of the LEDs. I had to stop the motor for spinning by grabbing the gears and then grabbing the whole motor to and connected it and it blinked just well.

    Now I just gotta solder some wires to the small prongs on the DC motor and solder the gear to itself so it will create the right amount of resistance.
     
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