Why some electrical wires were coiled?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Lightfire, Apr 23, 2011.

  1. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
    690
    21
    Hello,

    I have seen many lights from different houses, shops, etc.

    The wire of lights is coiled (not whole, the first 1/4 meter, I guess).

    Why they are coiled?

    Thanks!
     
  2. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
    4,018
    1,537
    Maybe as a strain relief? they don't do that here(USA) that I know of. Do you have a picture?
     
    Lightfire likes this.
  3. oidium45

    Active Member

    Apr 24, 2010
    130
    8
    Without seeing a photo I could tell you that it has become common practice for me when installing a heating and air-conditioning unit to coil extra thermostat wire around a tool/screwdriver creating a "spring" look with some of the excess wire. This allows for extra wire when needed for splices/repairs without having an extra foot or so of wire hanging down into the equipment.
     
    Lightfire likes this.
  4. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
    690
    21
    Eh? :D
    You're correct. I guess.............
     
  5. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
    2,428
    1,328
    Having done some residential wiring before, I can tell you that it is very difficult (and annoying) to have to splice together short sections of wire inside junction boxes and within the walls. My guess is that oidium45 is correct in saying that it allows extra wire to be placed in a small place for future electrical repairs.
    Der Strom
     
    Lightfire likes this.
  6. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
    1,571
    230
    your kidding of course, right?

    It's important that missleading information isn't allowed to stand uncorrected, for the sake of those googling through. By code, there are NO SPLICES allowed outside of accessible junction boxes. Within junction boxes, box size dictates how many wires, connections, and devices it can contain.

    Good practice will have 6-10" of wire within the box, providing ample for retermination. Strain relief provision should be made prior to entering the box, and should not be pulled out.

    As indicated, it may be for strain relief, or more likely, 'local practice', where it was concieved as useful, than carried over as general practice. Local codes often service local needs, and a special of significant need could be served. Up here in the northern oil patch, wires exiting a buried trench where often coiled as strain relief before termination. It serviced the code, but general practice found the coil often bound before relieving and the termination pulled out. The new practice is then to accordian the wire in the trench before exiting. The code has not changed, wire is still coiled, but our accordian refiefs rarely require servicing.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2011
    Lightfire likes this.
  7. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
    690
    21
    Yea, I guess too.
    Um, do you think there is a limitations on how many wires should be only in junction box? I know junction box, but never had used it. :)

    Thanks mates. :)
     
  8. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
    2,428
    1,328
    The limitations on the amount of wire allowed in a junction box depends on the size of the wire (12-2 or 14-2 Romex, for example), the size of the box, and the number of gangs. The volume specifications are most often printed inside the box itself and provide the maximum limitations.
    Der Strom
     
  9. GetDeviceInfo

    Senior Member

    Jun 7, 2009
    1,571
    230
    your best bet is to refer to your local codes. As indicated, box size has certain allowances for fill. This is typically spec'd in number of wires/size, but will reduce that according to if the box holds a device (ie; receptacle), or has connections.

    Looking at it from another angle, boxes are sized according to what your wiring situation calls for.
     
  10. PackratKing

    Well-Known Member

    Jul 13, 2008
    850
    215
    Annoying doesn't even come close !!

    I Have done wiring for remodeling in my own home -- I am not a licensed electrician, tho' still obligated, if not even more so, to adhere to code and safety regulations. I still must satisfy codes before I close things up. Inspectors have the dispicable ability to make you tear out wrong work, and do it properly, which computes to a waste of time and materials, hence my signature
    I make it a habit for my own convenience - awa that of the next poor slob -- to leave at least 10" of slack accordioned outside the junction or outlet box for future reference.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2011
Loading...