Why Magenets poles considered in this way.? Why can't around this way.

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Santhakumar, Jun 10, 2016.

  1. Santhakumar

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 17, 2015
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    Hi.

    magnetic poles always considered as shown in 1st figure.
    Why can't it be in other way as shown in second figure.

    upload_2016-6-10_16-59-47.png

    * If rectangle matters then what if a magnet is in square shape.

    Santhakumar.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2016
  2. hp1729

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    Nov 23, 2015
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    Yes, there are both kinds of magnets.
     
  3. Techno Tronix

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    Jan 10, 2015
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    I agree. There are both kinds of magnets available.

    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     
  4. bertus

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  5. Techno Tronix

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    Thanks for the interesting information bertus. This may really helpful.
     
  6. Santhakumar

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 17, 2015
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    In both cases same only..shorter edges behaving as north and south poles..my question is why can't longer sides be north and south poles.
     
  7. bertus

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  8. wayneh

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    They can. If you shop for magnets, you can find almost any configuration you can imagine. Yes, some configurations are far more common. Disc magnets are usually polarized along their axis. Bar magnets are usually as you have described. But the other configurations can be found.
     
  9. MrAl

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    Jun 17, 2014
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    Hi,

    Those kind are actually very popular because they are used as refrigerator magnets and magnets used for holding up tools and stuff.

    If you cut a magnet in half, you get two magnets, each with N and S poles oriented the same same as the original magnet. If you then cut one of those halves in half, you get two smaller magnets, same orientation. if you keep doing this until you get a very small magnet it willl be very thin and have orientation such that one face is N and one face is S. If you cut the whole magnet up like that you would have a bunch of thin, flat, magnets with N and S poles on the faces not on the edges.

    Spherical magnets present a very special case where the northern hemisphere is N and the southern S (or vice versa). This means a bunch of them orientate themselves in interesting patterns, all without human intervention in some cases. One configuration is a hex shape, which is like what could be part of a crystal structure.
     
  10. djsfantasi

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 11, 2010
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    If it's a square, it CAN be the other way. Imagine a magnet oriented as in your first picture. Grasp it and rotate it 90 degrees. It looks like your second picture.
     
    ErnieM and shortbus like this.
  11. wayneh

    Expert

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    Or the poles could be along the Z axis, making it like the typical disk magnet, just square.
     
  12. WBahn

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    Mar 31, 2012
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    You could also cut a magnet so that opposite corners are the poles. Or any other configuration.
     
  13. GopherT

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    Nov 23, 2012
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    There is one magnet that even attracts a pole of the same name.
     
  14. WBahn

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    ???

    Could you elaborate?

    I've seen magnets that appear to attract either side of a similar magnet, but that was a bit of an illusion because each side actually consisted of alternating north-south poles. If you dragged the two faces across each other you could definitely feel the skip-stick behavior that resulted.
     
  15. GopherT

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    It is called "earth". Everyone calls it the "North Pole" but it is really a South Pole magnetically.
     
  16. crutschow

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    There are also some interesting magnet arrangements that have most of their field directed to one side such as the Halbach Array.
    They are used in some versions of Maglev trains, among other uses.
     
  17. WBahn

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    Ah, so word games.

    But I suppose a worthwhile point to bring to the TS's attention.
     
  18. Santhakumar

    Thread Starter Member

    Mar 17, 2015
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    Thanks for the information..
    Thanks all.
     
  19. Santhakumar

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    Mar 17, 2015
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  20. atferrari

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    Jan 6, 2004
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    Hola MrAl,

    Not sure if you are talking of the same I found out some time ago.

    Magnets to be stuck on the fridge door are usually "formatted" with an unusual layout: specific layer magnetized along consecutive narrow stripes of alternate polarity. I even recall one or two where, if looking carefully, there were mechanical traces of the process.

    The most simple way to verify it: taking two magnets with the magnetized sides in contact and by sliding them slowly in the appropriate sense, you could feel the successive attractions/rejections.

    Explained here.
     
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