Why does this capacitor have 4 terminals?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Paul Hemans, Jul 4, 2016.

  1. Paul Hemans

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 8, 2015
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    0
    Attached image is a Green-cap 500F 2.7V capacitor mh47765
    I don't understand the connections. One is obviously "-" and another (opposite) is marked as "+", are the other 2 just for support on a circuit board? They have no markings that would indicate it functions like this;
    http://www.hificollective.co.uk/components/claritycap_tc_4terminal.html

    They are also equidistant from the "+" terminal.

    Thanks.
     
  2. recklessrog

    Member

    May 23, 2013
    338
    102
    Depending on the manufacturer, two are only for support when soldered into a pcb. sometimes two are pos and two are neg check with an ohmmeter if you have two pairs connected together.
    The one in the photo shows the neg towards you, the pos is probably the one opposite. the other two are probably not connected and just for fixing.
     
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  3. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
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    You should check the manufacturer datasheet for the correct usage of the dummy terminals. Some are required to make no electrical connection because they are resistively connected to the negative terminal through the electrolyte.
     
  4. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
    10,571
    2,381
    What is the value shown on the case, it will tell you if it is a multi value or just a single cap.
    Max.
     
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  5. Paul Hemans

    Thread Starter New Member

    Jul 8, 2015
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  6. dl324

    Distinguished Member

    Mar 30, 2015
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    It depends on the manufacturer.
    This is for CDE 382L/LX caps:
    upload_2016-7-4_16-18-53.png
    upload_2016-7-4_16-18-24.png
     
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  7. dannyf

    Well-Known Member

    Sep 13, 2015
    1,835
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    to minimize contact resistance -> can be a source of significant losses under high ripple current.
     
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