Why are medical buildings so cold?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by #12, Apr 21, 2013.

  1. #12

    Thread Starter Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,261
    6,768
    I caught this idea from Maxpower and decided to start a thread.

    Anyone that has awaken after surgery knows the first job is to get warm. I think they keep the surgical suites cold because it reduces blood loss and keeps the surgeon from dripping sweat in the wound. After all, he is working hard and fast when he is doing surgery. Then you find that the standard hospital room is cold, the doctors office is cold, and so on. I see nurses wearing sweaters when it's 90 degrees F outside. I have crawled out of my sick bed to turn the thermostat up.

    Why do they do that?
     
  2. luvv

    Member

    May 26, 2011
    186
    31
    Perhaps the cold gives a sense of sterility?

    No idea really..have often wondered the same when I had the occasion to wear one on those rear exposing gowns...
     
  3. killivolt

    Active Member

    Jan 10, 2010
    348
    310
    All I've found is it slows the spread of Germs and Bacteria.

    #12 your right, they also say that it is more comfortable for the Doctors and Nurses. Keeps them from sweating feeling to hot.

    Edit: I really never thought about it. It's a good question.
     
    #12 likes this.
  4. #12

    Thread Starter Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,261
    6,768
    I think they are called, "Seymour" gowns. (see more:D)
     
  5. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,765
    2,535
    While I don't know myself why myself I do know it is good for the respiratory system. Air conditioning was invented for a tuberculosis clinic by a doctor. My mom had COPD, it was what killed her in the end. Air conditioning and cold air was not a luxury for her, it kept her alive longer than the doctors gave her to live.

    It kept my Dad very uncomfortable however, since diabetes is just the opposite. Different diseases, different sensitivities.
     
    killivolt and #12 like this.
  6. strantor

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 3, 2010
    4,302
    1,988
    They put you in a 60 degree room with nothing but half a thin sheet to cover up with and leave you there for hours. Nobody questions it until now. I equate that to taking your car to the mechanic, and while waiting to get to your car, they set it out in the 110 degree summer sun with butane heaters blowing into the front of it and the accelerator held down with a brick. Hey, if it breaks down, it's already at the mechanic.
     
    killivolt and #12 like this.
  7. #12

    Thread Starter Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,261
    6,768
    and if I'm weakened by shivering, and succumb to a germ disease, Hey, I'm already in the hospital:D
     
    strantor and killivolt like this.
  8. Sue_AF6LJ

    Member

    Mar 16, 2013
    45
    27
    Actually I like it cold in the hospital and in my room when I sleep.
    If it were up to me my room would be no more than about fifty degrees.
    Here in Southern California its always too hot. One of the windows in my room is always open, so is the other, however it has a peace of Lexan in place of the screen, which provides a means to bring in transmission lines in for the radio gear. :)

    The window that has the screen in it has only been closed for short periods of time, never for weather, once for the 2003 and 2007 firestorms we had down here it was closed for a week or so, I didn't care to breathe ash thank you. Other than those occasions the window stays open for both fresh air and cooling.

    Besides it never gets cold enough here to run a heater.

    This is what living in central Oregon for four years will do to you, everything over 70 degrees is HOT.
     
  9. #12

    Thread Starter Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,261
    6,768
    Come spend August in Florida. That will cure your perception of what "hot" is!

    I moved to California for 5 years, and it took me nearly a year to adapt to how cool it is there. I would get a slight bit warm and break out in the drenching sweat that is Florida Living. Then the desert air would hit me and chill the sweat to about 39 degrees, and I'd start sneezing. I had to wear a trench coat for months while I adjusted to the cool that is California. And that was after I spent a snowy 4 months in Indiana! (Christmas with the family, then waiting for Mardi Gras before going west.) From drenching sweats to repairing a truck, cold steel at 20 degrees in the snow, and then California took some adjusting to? Go figure.

    ps, (Agreement) I never learned how to light the heater in my apartment when I lived in California.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2013
    Sue_AF6LJ likes this.
  10. Rbeckett

    Member

    Sep 3, 2010
    205
    32
    Lower temps make it more difficult for pathogens to survive and multiply. Most med facilities are maintained at 68 degrees for just that reason. If the temp was allowed to get up to normal the bacteria could take hold and grow on just about any surface and for patients like me that could get really ugly quick. I have a line directly into my peritonium and have to maintain sterile field when I am connecting or disconnecting from the dializer to avoid giving myself peritonitis. Peritonitis can be fatal if it gets into your blood and you develope bacteremia like I did when I had my Aorta replaced and lost my kidneys. Theres a real reason, not just some over priced doc running the AC because he can...
    Bob
     
    strantor and #12 like this.
  11. shortbus

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 30, 2009
    4,004
    1,525
    I always thought it was at doctors request. For what the cold does to the pretty nurses. :)
     
    strantor and #12 like this.
  12. Sue_AF6LJ

    Member

    Mar 16, 2013
    45
    27
    This is what my roommate says, she works in the health care industry.
    I have been in and out of hospital several times in my life and always found the cool in the OR and in recovery to be conducive to sleep.
     
    #12 likes this.
  13. #12

    Thread Starter Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,261
    6,768
    OK. We seem to have a consensus. Bacteria also get uncomfortable at temperatures below 70F.
     
  14. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
    20,765
    2,535
    Just like most of us.
     
  15. maxpower097

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2009
    795
    388
    Germs breed much faster in warm temps and surfaces. So they keep them colder because it helps prevent spreading germs.
     
  16. joeyd999

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 6, 2011
    2,675
    2,723
    Cold air also carries less moisture...prevents mold growth.
     
    #12 likes this.
  17. gerty

    AAC Fanatic!

    Aug 30, 2007
    1,153
    304
    Well I found one reason this week. Went in for my annual physical and the air was out in the office. It was kinda humid and between that and, my hair,
    they had a terrible time trying to get the EKG sensor pads to stick to me.
    The nurse had to shave spots on my chest (as usual) wipe my skin , and stick a pad quickly. Ended up using about 20 pads for a 12 lead EKG...
     
    #12 likes this.
  18. #12

    Thread Starter Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,261
    6,768
    Aha. Sweaty people are slippery and hard to duct tape.

    True, Joey. Cold air will have a lower dew point (than warm air) for its percentage of humidity, and everything else, being warmed by heat conducting into the building or radiating from humans, will not provide a condensing surface. If anything is going to condense, it will be on the outside of the building, not the inside (assuming no air leaks jetting outside air into the building).

    Thanks, guys.
     
Loading...