Who says you can't join the space race from your Garage?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by MaxHeadRoom, Jan 2, 2015.

  1. MaxHeadRoom

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  2. LDC3

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  3. cmartinez

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  4. cmartinez

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    This is a far better article. I have to admit I've been fascinated with this sort of thing ever since I was a kid, but I also consider myself a skeptic... a skeptic with an open mind, but a skeptic nevertheless. Extraordinary claims must be supported by extraordinary proof...

    In the end it all comes down to resources, that is, how much does it cost to answer the question?
     
  5. joeyd999

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    I don't believe he's discovered a new "force" -- to discover any forces that we don't already know about is going to take more than 100W of power.

    And, the title indicates a "Warp Drive", but then says this:

    I am sure he has misinterpreted his data. But, "compressing the fabric of space" is not warp drive. Warp drive would require the creation of a discontinuity in the fabric of space, not a compression. Geez, mass compresses space all by itself (through its gravity), and no power is required.
     
  6. cmartinez

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    Quite true...
    The problem with this kind of research, is not only founding, but prestige.
    I mean, how many serious scientist would be willing to risk even giving their opinion on stuff like this? But then again, what if he is up to something? Or not? I believe it was Carl Sagan who once said that there is no such thing as a bad question, and yet I see the scientific community behaving like that a lot of times.
    The seriousness of the claims made by any scientist can be measured by looking at the scientists that even bother to respond to arguments... I mean... if I were to declare something unusual, and Mr Stephen Hawking took the time to discredit my ideas... well then I'd be honored to have been proven wrong by someone of his caliber...
    Then again, lots of scientists have been met with ridicule in the past by their own peers... until they're eventually redeemed and proved right...
     
  7. GopherT

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    Probably just another misunderstanding of magnetism. Surprisingly he did not seek the more common quest of magnetically supported perpetual motion and instead took a more original tack and sought to disrupt (compress) the time-space continuum.
     
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  8. GopherT

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    Do you have a modern example of that? Where the PEERS are not oppressed by government or church.. And they are true "peers", with adequate education. And the ridicule is over a significant new discovery and not a hair-splitting semantics or interpretation.
     
  9. cmartinez

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    Well... everyone knows that perpetual motion is so not cool anymore... so now people have to come up with something more à la mode...
    I haven't bothered to google it... but I wonder if he's published the working principles and the plans and diagrams for his experimental device...
     
  10. cmartinez

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    Well yes I do... but I can't document it right at this moment... it's about a scientist that proposed there were sound waves bouncing back and forth present in the sun's structure, that was back then in the early 70's... then there was this economist from the 50's predicting the decline of the rate of growth of population due to economic factors... They were both laughed at by their own peers...
     
  11. #12

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    I'll believe it when he comes back yesterday. :p

    Wait...that's time travel. :confused:

    What do we need here, a piece of Saturns' rings? A creature from Rigel 8?
     
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  12. cmartinez

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    You've got it all wrong... for scientific proof, we'd need the one ring to rule them all... or a unicorn's tusk... whichever's found first...
     
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  13. joeyd999

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    Yes, I am a skeptic, but I would love to believe a claim like this. But I simply cannot. The numbers don't add up.

    He has claimed to discover a new "force" that becomes evident at 100W of power. But, any force that we don't know about must either be exceedingly weak, or operate over exceedingly small distances. Detecting and measuring such a force would require more energy than the most powerful particle accelerators in operation today (or else such a force would have resulted in anomalous data in experiments already conducted).
     
  14. cmartinez

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    Sad but true... then again... I, for once, refuse to accept that we'll never be able to travel faster than the speed of light... there must be a workaround ... although Einstein has been proven right in innumerable occasions, and as a scientist and engineer, I just have to accept that (for the time being)
     
  15. joeyd999

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    Einstein was both right and wrong about many things (think, "God does not play dice..."). But he was also practical. He very rarely appealed to magical unknowns to explain away his findings (think, "cosmological constant").
     
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  16. joeyd999

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    BTW, I've got my own crazy theories of the universe that most of you would think are nuts.

    But, to date, no data has been generated that disproves them.

    Someday, when (if) gravity waves (or gravitons) are discovered, I will admit I am wrong, as their non-existence is a fundamental requirement of my theories.
     
  17. GopherT

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    I only know the word, not the concept. In any case, I always wondered if gravitons would push or pull. For example, would a graviton gun (laser) ("graser"), push or pull the target relative to the gun.
     
  18. cmartinez

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    How crazy could your theories be? I, for once, am convinced that there must be multiple universes out there, and different realities keep constantly springing from our own (the multiple worlds interpretation of quantum mechanics) I guess it's nice to think and meditate about such things as long as they don't make us lose our sanity
     
  19. cmartinez

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    That's called a "tractor beam"... in trekkie talk... ;)
     
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  20. joeyd999

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    I've been developing these theories over the last 25 years or so. In fact, I predicted the "flatness" and "smoothness" of the universe before experimental microwave background radiation data proved it.
     
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