Which of these courses is most useful for an EE?

Discussion in 'Off-Topic' started by Ryuk, Jul 21, 2013.

  1. Ryuk

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 9, 2012
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    So I have to pick 2 of the following 3 courses: C++ for Engineers, thermodynamics, and statics.

    As an EE student, I would imagine the C++ course would be the most useful since many electrical engineers in the field of control and signal processing do software programming.

    I'm most interested in thermodynamics so I'd figure that would be a good second choice. Besides, I think knowledge of thermal systems is useful for power engineers?

    As for the statics class, I don't think I would benefit much from it since I've already taken a basic class on engineering mechanics. I think the only difference would be learning statics analysis using multivariable calculus.
     
  2. monster_catfish

    Active Member

    Mar 17, 2011
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    If you are permitted to choose, the paired mechanical engineering courses of Vector Statics and Vector Dynamics are fun, interesting and a bit less mathematically intensive than Thermodynamics, though no less applicable to real world engineering.
     
  3. Mimi*

    New Member

    Jul 21, 2013
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    honestly if i were you id choose c++ courses + matlab as their too important for students of this field.
     
  4. tshuck

    Well-Known Member

    Oct 18, 2012
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    One of the weakest point of most EEs is their programming. I would suggest you take an object-oriented class, at least once, but the lack of statics may be a bit of a hindrance in becoming a well-rounded engineer.

    In short, C++, you can never program too much! ;)
     
  5. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    Why can you only choose two? Why not take all three?
     
  6. Brownout

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 10, 2012
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    I agree. In 20 years of EE, I've never had any use for statics.
     
  7. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    I've used it several times. Designing a load cell, analyzing the current drive requirements for a cryostat drive system, choosing the strain gages for a deflection gage, and several others.

    I've also applied some of the analysis techniques taught in statics to electronic circuits, though the lines are so blurred for me any more that I only remember doing it, not the specifics.
     
  8. ErnieM

    AAC Fanatic!

    Apr 24, 2011
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    There's only a 50-50 percent chance you will ever need statistics as an EE.

    I never did (which might explain why my estimate is so off).
     
  9. Ryuk

    Thread Starter New Member

    Oct 9, 2012
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    Well, two is just the requirement for non-electrical engineering classes that I have to take.

    Truthfully, I would love to take more mechanical engineering classes but I need to make sure to complete those classes that are going to count towards my degree first.

    I wish the EE program at my school made more ME classes required. Based on my internship experience, having some mechanical knowledge does benefit an EE.
     
  10. WBahn

    Moderator

    Mar 31, 2012
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    You definitely need to be sure that your requirements are covered, but don't settle for stopping at just your requirements. One of the things that many technical interviewers frown upon is someone that has ONLY done the bare requirements because it shows a lack of personal interest and initiative. Whereas if you are taking one or two non-required courses each term it demonstrates both and a genuine interest to learn.
     
  11. Alan brad

    New Member

    Aug 29, 2013
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    i think For EE students C++ is the best one..because EE students able to go both way software and hard ware,,..for hard ware side get work is very difficult so u must know to choose about C++ lanuage this one is even you to get software side job.!
     
  12. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    Take the thermo class with C++.

    An excellent understanding of heat will change the way you think about voltage drops in any circuit you design.
     
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