Which in this picture is the 0.1µF and 1µF radial?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Lightfire, May 22, 2011.

  1. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    Hello,

    OK. I purchased this capacitors somewhere and I am confusing which is the 0.1µF and 1µF radial. So which?

    Take a look at my attachment?

    Thanks!!!
     
  2. hgmjr

    Moderator

    Jan 28, 2005
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    No attachment present in your post.

    hgmjr
     
  3. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    I have already included a attachment. :)
     
  4. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Ceramic disk is labeled 104, which is 10 0000 (4 zeros).
    100000pf = 0.1µF

    Blue cap is unreadable in picture, but I think it says 1nF.
    This is one nanofarad, which 1nf = 1000pf = 0.001µF

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SI_prefix
     
  5. magnet18

    Senior Member

    Dec 22, 2010
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    Neither of those capacitors is of the radial design.
    1uF capacitors usually look like tiny little metal cans wrapped in plastic (usually black & grey)
     
  6. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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  7. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    capacitors: 0.1µF ×4, 1µF radial beased on the parts required for my project

    What does this means? They should be both radial? I mean this means, I need radial for 0.1uF and 1uF? or one of them are axial? Pls help!!!

    thanks
     
  8. t06afre

    AAC Fanatic!

    May 11, 2009
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    The blue one is to small to be 1uF. But the other (the disk type) is the 0.1uF
     
  9. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    Anyway, the orange capacitors I have purhcased has this description

    F
    104
    ___
    KCK

    And the blue has (logo like A) then 1P2
     
  10. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    No sign of a package yet?

    Where are you getting your parts? You have something close by?

    Radial just means the leads are coming out of the bottom instead of the sides, which is axial. Resistors are generally axial, capacitors both.

    I have 1µF in every case style, including ceramic disk (large), tantalum (small, very small), electrolytic, and other.

    I believe the markings on the blue cap were 1nK63, in which case it is what I said it was, a 0.001µF cap.
     
  11. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    Would someone please convert this to pF.

    1uF and 0.1uF

    thanks
     
  12. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    µF = 1E-6
    nF = 1E-9
    pF = 1E-12

    1µF = 1000000pf
    0.1µF = 100000pf

    Count the number of zeros.
     
  13. bertus

    Administrator

    Apr 5, 2008
    15,645
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    Hello,

    For the question Radial versus Axial, I have take a picture from some electrolitic capacitors.

    [​IMG]

    The one with the leads on BOTH sides is called AXIAL.(the wires are on the axe of the component.)
    The one with the leads on ONE side is called RADIAL.

    For tha values and codings of capacitors take a look at this page:
    http://www.sentex.ca/~mec1995/gadgets/caps/caps.html

    Bertus
     
    Last edited: May 22, 2011
  14. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    I have many European EPCOS blue 1nF/5%/63V caps that look exactly like that. They are metalized plastic film type. The leads have 0.2" spacing.
     
  15. Wendy

    Moderator

    Mar 24, 2008
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    Pretty much what I said in post #10. However, the markings in this case suggest otherwise (assuming I'm reading them correctly).
     
  16. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    I know that J is 5%, K is 10% and M is 20%. I have never bought K or M, just J fairly accurate film capacitors.
     
  17. magnet18

    Senior Member

    Dec 22, 2010
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  18. Lightfire

    Thread Starter Well-Known Member

    Oct 5, 2010
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    Actually yes. It was "1nK63" but in the receipt, it is not 0.001μF. Indeed, a "Ceramic 1μF". Help?
     
  19. Audioguru

    New Member

    Dec 20, 2007
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    A 1nF capacitor is not 1uF.
    A metalized plastic film capacitor is not ceramic.
     
  20. DerStrom8

    Well-Known Member

    Feb 20, 2011
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    I don't think it's very common for a ceramic capacitor to be rated in the uF range--only nF and pF. What you need is a 1uF electrolytic, like the one shown below.
    [​IMG]

    Der Strom
     
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