Where to get a 1/2 hp ele motor? (spare parts )

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by joulian, Apr 3, 2010.

  1. joulian

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Aug 27, 2009
    53
    0
    Hey guys my shop fan ( as seen in pic on Harbor Freights website below )
    locked up.

    http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=93532

    Its not hot yet. So i am not in a big hurry to get it fixed. I took the cover off yesterday, its not a sealed motor but it has a pretty long shaft.

    Does anyone know what other appliance or household device that would have the same sort of motor by default?

    I was thinking maybe a A/C Window unit fan motor or washer machine.

    I am not buying a motor that cost $80+shipping when the fan is old and a knew one is not much more. Of course its not 95 degrees yet either.. never say never lol.
     
  2. kkazem

    Active Member

    Jul 23, 2009
    160
    26
    Hi,
    I would try looking for surplus electronic stores on the web. There are several in the L.A. area, and I'm sure also all over the U.S. You should be able to get a working, used motor for much cheaper than $80, and shipping by UPS ground shouldn't be more than $10 to $20.

    Good luck,
    Kamran Kazem
     
  3. Bychon

    Member

    Mar 12, 2010
    469
    41
    Air conditioning condensors use "air over" fan motors with 4 bolts sticking out of the back end. The interior halves use a "belly band" motors. If that would work, look up an air conditioning contractor and try to get a motor out of a dead air conditioner. Then there is the idea of buying (2) $10 bearings if you find that yours are replacable.
     
  4. joulian

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Aug 27, 2009
    53
    0
    hmmm Bychon i had thought the bearings were seized since i can't turn the fan blade.

    I have never replaced bearings in an Ele motor b4. If i replace them what are the chances of it still working? Is there a way to test the windings ?
     
  5. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    If the bearings have seized, the motor itself might still be OK if the thermal switch was working. The idea of the thermal switch is that it cuts power to the motor if it gets too hot.

    If your motor doesn't have a thermal switch (or if it was faulty), then the windings are probably toast.

    Electric motor repair shops use a device called a "megger" on the windings. The megger uses high voltage at very low current to see if the windings have an acceptable leakage.

    See if there is an electric motor repair shop near you. Trying to swap out the bearings yourself without using the proper tools may result in destruction of the motor. Motor shops have various types of presses/extractors available to gently ease the bearings out without stressing the motor frame.

    Don't put stress on the fan blades by trying to turn the motor using the blades as a lever. If you bend them at all, the fan will be out of balance, and the blades will be permanently weakened. Having a fan blade break on you is a very exciting (and noisy) experience. :eek:

    If you start whacking away at it with a big hammer, you'll get the bearings out - but it won't be worth putting back together.
     
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2010
  6. joulian

    Thread Starter Active Member

    Aug 27, 2009
    53
    0
    thanks sgt wookie

    i ll check it out.

    Do washer machines usually have that motor?
    or do you have any idea what would be close to that motor i might keep in mind when looking around. I think i dish washer or dryer might be different.
     
  7. SgtWookie

    Expert

    Jul 17, 2007
    22,182
    1,728
    Many AC condensers (the outside units) have large fan motors in them; some have multiple speeds. However, they generally run on 240v for better efficiency. If you replaced your m otor with one of those, it might fit, but then you would have to run it using a 240v outlet.
     
  8. Bychon

    Member

    Mar 12, 2010
    469
    41
    I forgot about the 240 volt thing because I don't find that to be a problem. I can make a 240 circuit in a matter of minutes. 120 volt fan motors are found in gas furnaces and window air conditioners. Washing machine motors are rather large compared to what you need. I don't think that will work. Clothes dryers are mostly 240 volt, and dishwashers seem to be a good idea.
     
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