When is a phase angle negative in any circuit?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by CMcG72, May 24, 2016.

  1. CMcG72

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 13, 2016
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    When I first started learning about series and parallel circuits, everything seemed Ok for me. Now I am learning about RC and RL circuits and the trigonometry that goes with them, including the arcsin arccos and arctan. I am just wondering when in any circuit the phase angle will be negative.
    My teacher at first said he wasn't going to look for proper quadrants of our vector diagrams, but now if it is supposed to be in Quadrant IV, it has to be in Quadrant IV, not I like usual.
    Thanks
     
  2. crutschow

    Expert

    Mar 14, 2008
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    In an inductor, the current through it lags the voltage across it (phase angle between voltage and current is negative).
    Does that answer your question?
     
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  3. Alec_t

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 17, 2013
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    Phase angle is relative. If signal A's phase is +ve with respect to signal B's, then signal B's phase is negative with respect to signal A's.
     
  4. CMcG72

    Thread Starter New Member

    May 13, 2016
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    It kind of does, we are working with inductors and capacitors right now, RC and RL circuits. We are also working with impedence, voltage, siemens, and current triangles, trigonometry.
     
  5. Papabravo

    Expert

    Feb 24, 2006
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    All the time. Every situation with a positive phase angle has a dual formulation with a negative phase angle, and they both represent the same thing.
     
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