What stores the sound a speaker produces?

Discussion in 'The Projects Forum' started by Marz Fisch, Dec 26, 2015.

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  1. Marz Fisch

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 26, 2015
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    What piece stores the information for a speaker to produce a particular sound?

    I am new to circuitry, and I am designing a wonderful product for blind dogs. I have found an investor, but he wants me to design the prototype before he pays for the patent.

    Any help would be greatly appreciated, I will be posting a handful of other questions regarding the assembly of my prototype circuit.

    Marshall
     
  2. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
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    You are going to design such a complex circuit and you don't know the answer to such a simple question?

    A CD player, a record player an MP3 player, the list is endless. Sometimes the sound is not "stored" but produced. Like from a microphone and someone's voice or an electric musical instrument like an electronic guitar.
     
  3. Marz Fisch

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 26, 2015
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    I am not designing a complex circuit, It will be simple. I am a 21 year old high-school dropout just trying to build a ball for my blind dog. I have had plenty of discouragement from everyone else, I don't need it on a forum of learning and sharing.

    I am trying to find out the particular piece of hardware I need to incorporate in my circuit to store the sound that my speaker will produce. I don't want to use a piezo buzzer, because most dogs would find the sound frightening...

    I will attach a picture of a circuit I am modeling off of, and only changing a few aspects of it.

    Again, I am seeking answers on this forum, not criticism and discouragement. Thank you for any ADVICE you can offer me,

    Marshall
     
  4. AnalogKid

    Distinguished Member

    Aug 1, 2013
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    Audio files can be stored on any memory device, like a flash drive or SD card. Designing a music player from scratch is not a beginner-level project. For a prototype, it might be easier to purchase a music player and modify it for external control.

    ak
     
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  5. Marz Fisch

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 26, 2015
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    AnalogKid, please refer to my last post on this thread, and take a look at the picture... I am designing a SIMPLE circuit to make a ball the produces a particular sound for 120 second. Nothing fancy.

    Marshall
     
  6. blocco a spirale

    AAC Fanatic!

    Jun 18, 2008
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    I didn't see any criticism or discouragement in Spinnaker's reply. Clearly, if you need a useful answer you must provided useful information, and you didn't. Look at 555 timer circuits; one configured as an astable to produce the tone and one as a monostable to provide the "on time" delay.
     
  7. Marz Fisch

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 26, 2015
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    blocco a spirale, take it as you will. We will not come to an agreement there.

    Also, I am wanting to produce a particular sound, not just a beep or tone. For example, I want it to "moo" or "ribbit" or "chuckle" or "laugh." What ever is simpler to produce without further complicating the circuit.

    Marshall

     
  8. wayneh

    Expert

    Sep 9, 2010
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    What sound do you want to reproduce? Tones, chirps, buzzes and such can be produced fairly simply (and not stored) but for reproducing animal sounds, waves crashing and so, it is usually simpler to store a sound file and play it back.

    Ah, you answered as I was writing.

    I think you'll want an off-the-shelf music player solution with your motion-controller added on.
     
  9. spinnaker

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 29, 2009
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    There are plenty of examples on line of how to make sounds with electronics

    Here are just some
    http://www.electroschematics.com/audio/


    The key word you use is "particular". That you will need to design yourself if you really want to be particular. In addition you will need to be able to design it in a compact size and rugged enough to put up with the play by dogs. Sorry but that is not a "simple" job.

    There are already such products on the market.



    Instead of designing your own from the ground up, it might be easier to hack one to suit your needs.
     
  10. Nykolas

    Member

    Aug 27, 2013
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    Look at www.nuvoton.com, under Products go to the ISD Voice ICs. I have used these many times and they work well. Many example circuits and app notes. E
     
  11. Marz Fisch

    Thread Starter New Member

    Dec 26, 2015
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    Spinnaker, I have spent a lot of time researching and testing different products. That ball (and all others on the market) is not designed for blind dogs, it only makes sound for a very brief moment when moved to encourage the ball being played with.

    There is no ball that exists that is what I am looking for, hence why I am designing my own. I have already worked out the durability part of it, and I have everything else in my patent ready to go. The ONLY thing I need to do before it is ready for submission is the diagram of the circuit.

    I assure you this isn't just some weird hair I got and started designing. This project is a year in the making, and I have covered everything else. All I need to do is make a prototype circuit...

    Also, my blind dog is afraid of whistles and beeps, that is why I am avoiding such sounds. Would a bird chirp be something easily reproduced?
     
  12. GopherT

    AAC Fanatic!

    Nov 23, 2012
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    How many people own blind dogs? Of those, how many want to throw a chirping ball at them?

    What inventive feature do you add to the intellectual property (an idea is not an invention, a working device is an invention). So, you are not allowed to patent something in the public domain. Any answer to your question will be in the public domain as soon as it is posted here. I see a conundrum.
     
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