What makes a strobe light strobe?

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by Gdrumm, Mar 12, 2014.

  1. Gdrumm

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Aug 29, 2008
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    I thought it was broken, but when I tap it on my workbench it flashes.

    I'm not sure if it is supposed to flash on it's own (I would think that it should).

    Anyway, I'm going to resolder the connections just in case something has come loose.

    Otherwise, I'm hoping someone sees a component in the pics that might be suspect.

    Thanks,
    Gary
     
  2. Gdrumm

    Thread Starter Distinguished Member

    Aug 29, 2008
    684
    36
    The re-soldering worked.
    Interestingly, all the joints looked solid.
    Just goes to show you I guess.

    Next time I'll try a suspected fix before I post.

    Thanks,
    Gary
     
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2014
  3. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
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    could you take a pic of the solder side?? only thing I can see which could cause what you describe is the potentiometer, could have a worn out wiper and when you tap it on the bench it makes the connection... or a broken solder joint :))).... a strobe should flash on its own once powered up, the pot should adjust the rate of the flashes....
     
  4. BMorse

    Senior Member

    Sep 26, 2009
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    sure, post as I am typing....lol glad you got it figured out.....
     
  5. MrChips

    Moderator

    Oct 2, 2009
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    What makes a strobe light strobe?

    If it didn't strobe then it isn't a strobe light.
     
    t06afre likes this.
  6. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    6,814
    Lucky you. Once upon a time, I chased a bad solder joint in a TV for half a day. The only way I found it was with an oscilloscope showing 2 different wave forms on each end of a jumper wire!

    Nobody would suspect a jumper wire to be "bad", and there were way too many solder joints in a vacuum tube TV to "shotgun" the board. I feel lucky that touching the solder pad with the scope probe didn't make the connection work while I was measuring. I would have never found it! The simplest problems can drive you nuts. (One of the reasons I quit doing TV's.)
     
  7. THE_RB

    AAC Fanatic!

    Feb 11, 2008
    5,435
    1,305
    Don't you have a Fluke #12 (the Fluke is actually called a #12).

    I've used one for years, it's a technician's multimeter that can can do beep continuity tests on tracks and wires in a live running TV.

    Enormously handy. :)
     
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