What is this connector called and how can I find small ones

Discussion in 'General Electronics Chat' started by MrSmoofy, Aug 26, 2014.

  1. MrSmoofy

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 28, 2014
    112
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    So I have some buttons and switches that I would like to find this type of connector for.

    doesn't need to have the plastic part. I'd like to be able to solder the wire to the connector.

    Terminals are:

    2x0.5mm
    and

    2.8x0.5mm

    Will I be able to find something like this?
     
  2. sirch2

    Well-Known Member

    Jan 21, 2013
    1,008
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    It's a spade connector. They are normally crimped onto the wire and the bit of plastic helps to stop the wire breaking at the joint.

    Just google "spade connector" you will find what you need.
     
  3. MrSmoofy

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 28, 2014
    112
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  4. MrSmoofy

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 28, 2014
    112
    5
    Thanks for the name that will help. So I shouldn't have a problem finding any that small then?
     
  5. MrSmoofy

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 28, 2014
    112
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  6. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Another term is Stake-on connectors, they come in 3 sizes of blade size and for various wire gauges.
    The colour indicates the wire gauge.
    Max.
     
  7. Theagentxero

    New Member

    Aug 26, 2014
    9
    3
    I always called them "spade terminals", but apparently they're called quick-disconnects.

    Digi-Key has them under the Breadcrumb trail:
    Code ( (Unknown Language)):
    1. Product Index > Connectors, Interconnects > Terminals - Quick Connects, Quick Disconnect Connectors
    Mouser has them under:
    Code ( (Unknown Language)):
    1. All Products   > Connectors   > Terminals w/ Search: Quick Disconnect
     
  8. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
    16,278
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    .1 inch by .02 inches :confused:
    That's really small!
    To me, .187 inches wide is the, "little ones".
    I would not have figured this out for you.
     
  9. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    By small do you mean spade terminal size or wire size?
    The red is for 18g etc.
    Blue for 14g
    Max.
     
  10. #12

    Expert

    Nov 30, 2010
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    The .1" by .02" describes the spade size.
     
  11. kubeek

    AAC Fanatic!

    Sep 20, 2005
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    It looks like a pretty standard small faston to me.
     
  12. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    I meant the OP title:
    "What is this connector called and how can I find small ones".;)
    Small gauge? small spade?

    Max.
     
  13. bwilliams60

    Active Member

    Nov 18, 2012
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    Go to your local auto parts stores. They sell them all day long every day.
     
  14. KJ6EAD

    Senior Member

    Apr 30, 2011
    1,425
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    The 0.110" size is a little bit rare but can be found.
     
  15. mcgyvr

    AAC Fanatic!

    Oct 15, 2009
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    "Standard sizes" in the US are .093"/.110"/.187"/.250" wide x .020" or .032" thickness
    Called "Quick connect" or "Faston (Amp now TE tradename)" or "Spade" connectors
     
    Metalmann likes this.
  16. inwo

    Well-Known Member

    Nov 7, 2013
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  17. MrSmoofy

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 28, 2014
    112
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    Spad size sorry I was not clear on that. Wire size doesn't matter to muc if it won't stay connected to the terminal :)

    Thanks for everyones help. Once I got the names google was much more helpful in finding what I need.
     
  18. JMW

    Member

    Nov 21, 2011
    88
    8
    Most auto parts stores carry them. However your local marine store will/may have water resistant types available. The crimp tool is important. The type that comes in a kit and also cuts screws is not a good choice. A ratchet type is preferred. It crimps in two places and completely crimps the connector. These are for stranded wire only. In addition the stranded wire used in house wiring is sometimes too stiff to crimp properly. As for soldering it is not recommended. The solder wicks up the wire and makes it susceptible to metal fatigue failure. Too make a water resistant connection, get the type with an extended sleeve, it has heat shrink with glue on the inside, it is quite good.
     
  19. MrSmoofy

    Thread Starter Member

    Jul 28, 2014
    112
    5
    not sure where I said I want water resistant. Also never said stranded. I actually would prefer soder not crimp but I do have a pair of crimpers.

    Was mostly looking for a easier way to connect to terminals of some buttons instead of soldering wires to them.
     
  20. MaxHeadRoom

    Expert

    Jul 18, 2013
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    Very bad form to use solid conductor in control wiring, usually asking for trouble.
    Max.
     
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